If you come across a word you dont know write it in a

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If you come across a word you don't know, write it in a blank space below. Try to figure out what the word means by looking at its context. Then use your dic - tionary or the Internet to look up the correct definition for the word. Word Definition annotation A brief explanation that accompanies whatever it ex- plains, such as an image, a line of poetry, or a difficult vocabulary word. endnote A note at the end of a chapter, section, or document that makes a comment or cites a source. footnote A note at the bottom of a page that makes a comment or cites a source. Fill in the blank or write a short answer for each question. 1. Write the name of the poem you've chosen to annotate here. Dover Beach by Matthew Arnold 2. Write the text of the poem you've chosen to annotate here. Include the title and the author. Underline any figurative language you've noticed. Circle or put parentheses around any words that seem to affect the mood, tone, or experi - ence of the poem. "Dover Beach" by Matthew Arnold The sea is calm tonight, The tide is full, the moon lies fair Upon the straits; on the French coast the light Gleams and is gone; the cliffs of England stand, Glimmering and vast, out in the tranquil bay.
Come to the window, sweet is the night air! Only, from the long line of spray Where the sea meets the moon-blanched land, Listen! you hear the grating roar Of pebbles which the waves draw back, and fling, At their return, up the high strand, Begin, and cease, and then again begin, With tremulous cadence slow, and bring The eternal note of sadness in. Sophocles long ago Heard it on the Agean, and it brought Into his mind the turbid ebb and flow Of human misery ; we Find also in the sound a thought, Hearing it by this distant northern sea. The Sea of Faith Was once, too, at the full, and round earth's shore Lay like the folds of a bright girdle furled. But now I only hear Its melancholy, long, withdrawing roar, Retreating, to the breath Of the night wind, down the vast edges drear And naked shingles of the world. Ah, love, let us be true To one another! for the world, which seems To lie before us like a land of dreams,
So various, so beautiful, so new, Hath really neither joy, nor love, nor light, Nor certitude, nor peace, nor help for pain; And we are here as on a darkling plain Swept with confused alarms of struggle and flight, Where ignorant armies clash by night. 3. Write your annotations here. Number them and make sure that each annota - tion corresponds to one of the lines from the poem where you either underlined an example of figurative language or circled a connotation or did both.

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