Communicate ephi or personal identifiers which reveal

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communicate ePHI or personal identifiers which reveal the identity of an individual” (HIPAA Security Rule, 2016).HITECHThe Health Information Technology for Clinical Health Act, HITECH Act, began under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009. It promotes “adoption of meaningful use of health care information and addresses privacy and security concerns associated with electronic health records and HIPAA” (Rivas, 2016). Electronic Medical Records (EMR) are now being used across the U.S for all major healthcare organizations such as hospitals and clinics, however universal access to providers, payers, and other agencies across the boards is not yet in place. HITECH defines health information technology as “hardware, software, integrated technologiesor related licenses, intellectual property, upgrades, or packaged solutions sold as services that are designed for or support the use by health care entities or patients for the electronic creation, maintenance, access, or exchange of health information. However, there is a consensus on the purpose of HIT (health information technology) as the use of devices for the management of information in
order to ensure that it is available to the right person at the right time and place” (Zeng, n.d.).Reason & StakeholdersThe reason why I have chosen to speak to you today about HIPAA, for my policy is because with working in the medical field I am affected daily by the laws. So in regards for this paper this law has both personal and professional relevance to me. A few examples of how I am affected by HIPAA daily at work include; telephone calls, where upon having to call a patient and get their answering machine, I can not leave information as to why I am calling on the message. I can only say this is “Thismessage is for (the patients name). This is Jessica with the Watson Clinic Lab, if you could please give me a call back at (our phone number). Our computer screens have black out protectors, so as to keep patient information safe so it is harder for people to see what is on our screens when walking by. However, where I work we do not have cubicals, making it a little hard for others not to hear personal information of others, such as name and date of birth. Eventually we will have cubicals, we are just having to wait on the funds to be available so that my location can be remodeled and updated. Three stakeholders of the policy that I might interview in regards to HIPAA would be:1.Kathy Pilkenton, Privacy Officer, HIPAA Compliance Office, Agency for Health Care Administration in Tallahassee, FL2.Brian Tuttle, Nationally Renowned HIPAA Compliance Consultant3.Joan Fitchett, Director of Laboratory Services of Watson Clinic, Lakeland, FLAlthough all three of these stakeholders would be great to interview because all three have extensive backgrounds and experience with HIPAA and the various laws thereof, Joan will be the easiest to get in contact with since I work under her in one of the laboratories she is the head of.
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