Neoclassical theory has been applied in order to cure or circumvent

Neoclassical theory has been applied in order to cure

This preview shows page 45 - 47 out of 52 pages.

Neoclassical theory  has  been  applied  in  order to  cure  or circumvent  inefficiency  and what conditions are necessary for the efficient allocation of resources and how market failures lead to inefficiencies and to suggest ways in which these distortions can be corrected. Figure 1.1 below shows that  total net benefit  is maximized when the  marginal cost  of producing or extracting one more units of the resources is equal to its marginal benefit to the consumer. This occurs at   Q *, where the demand and supply curves intersect. In a perfectly competitive market, the invisible hand will ensure that  Q * is the quantity produced. The marginal cost curve in the figure is upward sloping because extraction costs increase as a resource becomes scarcer. The resulting  producer surplus , or profit is called a  scarcity rent . In this diagram, the producer surplus is area   aPb , and the consumer surplus is area   DPb . Together they yield a maximum benefit equal to   Dab . In principle, some of these scarcity rents could be taxed and used for environmental protection or other socially purposes. If resources are scarce and are rationed over time, scarcity rents may arise even when the marginal cost of production is constant as in figure 1.2. The owner of a scarce has a finite volume of resources X to sell (75 units) and knows that by saving a portion of it for future sales, the owner can charge a higher price today. In fig 1.2, assume that the owner has 75 units available. If the owner is willing to offer only 50 units for sale today, the market price for the scarce resource is  P s . The scarcity rent collected by the owner of the resource is equal to  P s abp , the shaded region
between price and marginal cost. In the absence of scarcity, all of the resources will be sold at the extraction cost  MC , 75 units will be consumed at one time, and no rents will be collected.  The proponents of the neoclassical free-market theory stress that inefficiency in the allocation of resources result from impediments to the operation of the free market or imperfections in the property rights system. So long all resources are privately owned and there are no markets distortions, resources are allocated efficiently. Perfect market property rights have 4 conditions. a. Universality : all resources are privately owned; b. Exclusivity : it must be possible to prevent others from benefiting from a privately owned resource; c. Transferability: the owner of the resource may sell the resource when desired; and d. Enforceability: the intended market distribution of the benefits from resources must be enforceable.

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture