ArkNavReport_TOC_Acronyms_ExecSummary.doc

Since the completion of the system in 1971 some

Info icon This preview shows pages 9–11. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Since the completion of the system in 1971, some approved dredged material disposal sites have reached capacity and new disposal sites are required to continue channel maintenance activities. Additionally, the construction of new river training structures would facilitate the maintenance of the 9-foot navigation channel. 2) Flow Management: Sustained high flows on the MKARNS have adversely influenced the safety and efficiency of commercial navigation operations and have resulted in flood damages along the river. The reliability and predictability of river flows affect navigation traffic utilization of the MKARNS. 3) Navigation Channel Depth: Commercial navigation is not at optimum productivity within the MKARNS since its 9-foot navigation channel limits towboat loads compared to the Lower Mississippi River’s authorized 12-foot channel. The feasibility study started in fiscal year (FY) 2000. To date, the total study cost is approximately $9.4 million. Since this is a navigation study for part of the inland waterway system, the feasibility study was conducted at full federal expense. This feasibility report consists of an executive summary, main report, figures, tables, and separate appendices. A Final Environmental Impact Statement, dated August 2005, was prepared and is presented in a separate document. Existing Project Background: The Arkansas River Navigation Study geographically encompasses the MKARNS from the Port of Catoosa near Tulsa, Oklahoma downstream to its confluence with the Mississippi River in southeastern Arkansas, as well as 11 reservoirs in Oklahoma that influence river flow within the MKARNS. The MKARNS is 445 miles in length and includes a series of 18 locks and dams (including Montgomery Point Lock and Dam) that provide for commercial navigation throughout its length. Beginning at the Mississippi River, the first 10 miles of the MKARNS is on the White River. At navigation mile (N.M.) 10 the system enters the Arkansas Post Canal and continues through the canal until it reaches the Arkansas River at approximately N.M. 19. The system changes from the Arkansas River into the Verdigris River at Muskogee, OK at N.M. 394 and terminates 50 miles upstream on the Verdigris at Catoosa, OK. The Corps maintains a minimum 9-foot channel on the system. Passage through MKARNS lock chambers is sized for a 3 by 3 configuration for 8 barges (195 feet long and 35 feet wide) and the towboat. Each of the 18 existing locks measures 110 feet wide and 600-feet long. ix
Image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Navigation channel widths are 300 feet on the White River, Arkansas Post Canal and Lake Langhofer; 250 feet on the Arkansas River; 150 feet on the Verdigris River; and 225 feet on San Bois Creek. Flows on the MKARNS are primarily influenced by the upper Arkansas River watershed upstream of its confluence with the Verdigris River (N.M. 394); as well as water storage and release from 11 reservoirs in Oklahoma. The 11 Oklahoma reservoirs are: Keystone Lake Oologah Lake Grand (Pensacola) Lake Lake Hudson Fort Gibson Lake Tenkiller Ferry Lake Eufaula Lake
Image of page 10
Image of page 11
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern