Intra subject direct replication and 2 inter subject

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intra-subject direct replication and 2 ) inter- subject direct replication In SCD research, there are three primary ways to ensure within-study replication all of which involve repeating a change between two adjacent conditions Sequential introduction and withdrawal designs include the repetition of the basic A-B comparison within a single participant Time-lagged designs include the repition of the basic A-B comparison across a set of 3 or more participants, behaviors, or contexts Rapid interative alteration designs include repetition of an _ A-B _ comparison, with single session replication and comparisons Direct intra-participant replication (historically termed (intra-subject) refers to repeating the experimental effect with the same participant more than once in the same study Inter-participant direct replication (historically inter-subject replication) refers to repeating the experimental effect with different participants When employing SCD's, what is considered the minimally acceptable amount of successful inter-participant (or inter-group) replications before moving on to a systematic replication attempt? THREE Variables you should consider in determining whether three replications are an adequate number include A )baseline data stability, B) consistency of effect with related findings C ) magnitude of effect D) adequacy of controlling threats to internal validity Clinical Replication Clinical Replication (as defined by Hersen and Barlow) refers to “the administration of a treatment package containing two or more distinct treatment procedures by the same investigator or group.. investigators…administered in a specific setting to a series of clients presenting similar combinations of multiple behavioral and emotional problems, which usually cluster together.” In clinical replication, the (and associates), combining techniques, demonstrate the intervention package with participants who demonstrate similar clusters of problem behaviors Systematic Replication A systematic replication is when a researcher carries out a planned series of studies that incorporate systematic changes from one study to the next and identifies them as a replication series, a systematic replication clearly exists Hersen and Barlow (1976) defined systematic replication as “any attempt to replicate findings from a direct replication series, varying settings behavior change agents, behavior disorders or any combination thereof Failure to replicate can lead and has, led to the discovery of limitations of current interventions and the discovery of new interventions
Different applied researchers may suggest slightly different definitions of systematic replication, but general guidelines on when and how to proceed with a systematic replication attempt are quite similar (pg. 90) Replication and External Validity A common criticism directed at SCRD research methodology always has been that findings cannot generalize beyond the individual The dynamic nature of SCD research may improve generality to clinical and educational contexts Regarding limitations of large group research, intra-subject

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