Members of the ruling class teach their children

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Members of the ruling class teach their children aesthetic preferences in order to pass along class-based cultural capital Differences in cultural capital mark the differences between the classes Cultural capital : learned skills, tastes and distinctions Criticized Marx for giving primacy to economic factors in class analysis, instead, he stressed the ability to use cultural and symbolic systems to police class boundaries Habitus : refers to a habituation gained through a prolonged, usually lifelong, process of learning and socialization within a particular context. A habitus can be seen as a cultural competency – an ability to live properly and effectively within a given culture. Simply, habitus is something that within a specific culture goes without saying – it does not need to be explained because it is understood by most people in the group. I.e. a properly socialized member of the upper class will know when to wear a tuxedo Social field : the social setting, domain, or institution within which the habitus is to be exercised. Examples of fields in society are politics, education and economies, each of which comprises a particular set of cultural relations. A field is also flexible, interacting with the social agents within it and begin shaped by these interactions. As well, fields are the sites for competition. Within fields, social agents are constantly competing for material and symbolic resources and
acting out power relationships. A social agent’s change of success is determined by cultural competence (or cultural capital) Glastra and Vedder used the concept of field to explain the experiences of asylum seekers and refugees Catlaw and Hu: also use this concept to analyze the construction of the bureaucratic or public administrative field in the US Wright: cricket becomes a restricted field unavailable to those lacking the necessary cultural capital and social class Gruner uses the concept of habitus to info, the analysis of neighbourhoods in Germany segregated by race Cultural Variation Popular culture : fragmented along age, sex, and social-class lines, i.e. market surveys, reflects influence of high culture (stereotypes) Bourdieu : culture reflects and supports the stratification system in a society. It allows powerful people to use culture – especially high culture to – glorify themselves, set themselves apart form others, and interact meaningfully within their restricted domain. It follows that learning the cultural code of the powerful would help other people establish relations with them The opera is an example of high culture and knowledge of opera is considered to be part of cultural capital o Familiarity with high culture is one form of cultural capital o Cultural capital includes a wide variety of skills that improves social relations. These include knowing how to speak interestingly, what topics to discuss, how to order food and eat graciously, how to dress stylishly but

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