Despite the annals clearly evolving tendency their

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Despite the annals clearly evolving tendency, their solid form and loan of events and quotes, the hagiographies represent a part of the contem- porary historiography, where it is possible, with the knowledge of the fixed fixtures, to approach specific elements of the individual writing 28 . Regarding the noted Durham copies, they typi- cally show successive changes or additions with interpolations, which in many cases have not been chronologically rendered. Likewise, both the writ- ing and the wording show that there were numer- ous different actors. Therefore, it is difficult, chro- nologically, to determine the individual interpola- tions. Regardless of this, it is possible to trace core historical elements in the texts e.g. the very rare name Guthred filium Hardacnut , where Hardacnut is linked to the Danish royal family. It is beyond any thought that the monks of Durham should be able to invent such a distinctive name. Still, the only proviso here could be that the name was not part of the original text in Historia , but first was inter- polated during the time after Cnut the Great and his son Hardecnut. However, a few essential Viking hoards have provided new numismatic information and evi- dence which legalizes the name Hardecnut.
A Silverdale coin with the inscription ‘Airdeco- nut’ proves the existence of the name before Cnut the Great's time. The design of the coin relates to known Cuerdale coins of the kings Siefredus and Cnut (c. 895-902). Two Viking hoards from Cuerdale and Silver- dale are dated to the time around 900. The British Museum writes about Silverdale - The artefacts and coins together bear witness to diverse cultural contacts and a wide Viking mercantile network, extending from Ireland in the West to central or northern Russia and the Islamic world in the East. The hacksilver and weight- adjusted armrings served as a form of currency in a bullion economy. This perspective further reinforces the picture gained most recently by study of the finds from the Vale of York hoard, discovered only in 2007. Probably the most significant connection to emerge from a preliminary examination of the Silverdale finds is the similarity shown by a number of the objects to pieces from the rather larger Viking- age hoard discovered at Cuerdale, near Preston in Lancashire in 1840. The Cuerdale hoard can be dated to c. 905-10 on the basis of the combination of the coins. The Silverdale hoard contains many of the same types, and was apparently buried at much the same time, or possibly slightly earlier. While further work may produce a more secure date, an approximate date of c. 900-910 seems safe at present . The approx. 44 kilogram of silver contained in the two hoards, including additional 617 coins from the Vale of York hoard deposited 927, gives a good idea of what size of lucrative import-export 29 busi- ness there was manage by the jointly kings from Dublin and York. The sources mention that king Sigfred of York maintained a fleet of 40 units.

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