This avoids nearly all momentary traffic peaks wasteful of transmission line

This avoids nearly all momentary traffic peaks

This preview shows page 340 - 354 out of 595 pages.

This avoids nearly all momentary traffic peaks wasteful of transmission line capacity. 340
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Addressing Momentary Traffic Peaks With priority, latency-intolerant traffic, such as voice, is given high priority and will go first. Latency-tolerant traffic, such as e-mail, must wait. More efficient than overprovisioning; also more labor- intensive. 341
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Addressing Momentary Traffic Peaks QoS guarantees reserved capacity for some traffic, so this traffic always gets through. Other traffic, however, must fight for the remaining capacity. 342
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Failure in the Target Breach Cost Matters Network Quality of Service QoS Network Design Security Planning Principles Centralized Management 343
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Threat Environment You cannot defend yourself unless you know the threat environment you face. 344
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Plan-Protect-Respond Companies defend themselves with a process called the Plan-Protect-Respond Cycle. 345
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Planning The Plan-Protect-Respond Cycle starts with Planning. We will look at important planning principles. 346
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Protecting Companies spend most of their security effort on the protection phase, in which they apply planned protections on a daily basis. We covered this phase in Chapter 3. 347
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Response Even with great planning and protection, incidents will happen, and a company must have a well-rehearsed plan for responding to them. 348
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Security Is a Management Issue, Not a Technology Issue Without good management, technology cannot be effective A company must have good security processes Security Planning Principles 349
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Security Planning Principles Risk analysis Comprehensive security Defense in depth Weakest link analysis Single points of takeover Least permissions in access control Security Planning Principles 350
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The goal is not to eliminate all risk You would not pay a million dollars for a countermeasure to protect an asset costing ten dollars You should reduce risk to the degree that it is economically reasonable You must compare countermeasure benefits with countermeasure costs Risk Analysis 351
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Risk Analysis Calculation Countermeasure None A Damage per successful attack $1,000,000 $500,000 Annual probability of a successful attack 20% 20% Annual probability of damage $200,000 $100,000 Annual cost of countermeasure $0 $20,000 Net annual probable outlay $200,000 $120,000 Annual value of countermeasure $80,000 Adopt the countermeasure? Yes Countermeasure A cuts the damage per successful attack in half, but does not change the annual probability of occurrence. 352
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Risk Analysis Calculation Countermeasure None A Damage per successful attack $1,000,000 $500,000 Annual probability of a successful attack 20% 20% Annual probability of damage $200,000 $100,000 Annual cost of countermeasure $0 $20,000 Net annual probable outlay $200,000 $120,000 Annual value of countermeasure $80,000 Adopt the countermeasure? Yes Countermeasure A Will have a net savings of $80,000 per year.
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