In the third stanza his father uses to polish his shoes and polished my good

In the third stanza his father uses to polish his

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he was living in, and he never noticed his father’s good qualities.In the third stanza, his father uses to polish his shoes "and polished my good shoes as well", but still the boy is "Speaking indifferently to him", thus admitting ungrateful ignorance from his ownside. In the end, it is clear that the child knew nothing about love and he did not know how to express love to his father and he was not able to appreciate his father’s good work taking care of him.Hayden’s “Those Winter Sundays” does not have many figurative languages; Hayden’s style is simple and straightforward. The poem has fourteen lines, it is a sonnet, though the lines lack a reliable rhythm. The author uses a regretful tone in the poem to explain how regretful he is by
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failing to recognize his father’s effort and care in his childhood. The title of the poem is an imagery "Those Winter Sundays" as it creates an image of a cold and a cloudy day thus producing a feeling of sadness. In conclusion, the poem educates people to be careful on how to treat others and to appreciate their love and care. Even though love is not expressed directly, always learn to appreciate others and make sure they know they are special and their love and care are valued and you are grateful to have them as family members and friends.Works cited"Robert Hayden: 'Those Winter Sundays? by David Biespiel."Poetry Foundation, 11Oct.2007, .Kelly J. Mays. The Norton Introduction to Literature: Shorter Twelfth Edition. Ed. 2016 MLA update. Page 814
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