Report 2007 carried out direct consultations with Nepali youth from diverse

Report 2007 carried out direct consultations with

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Report (2007) carried out direct consultations with Nepali youth from diverse ethnic backgrounds and local youth organisations. Recommendations specifically highlighted the need for positive role models and youth programs that promote Nepali culture (pp.8–9). The following cases demonstrate the culturally appropriate and effective nature of using indigenous culture as a strengths-based approach and emphasises how youth participation in these programs is strengthening positive development in youth for their advocacy and participation in the development in Nepal. Case Study (1) Search for Common Ground (SFCG)—INGO, Kathmandu Kailali District, Patharaya Village Search for Common Ground (SFCG) is an international organisation that operates across 18 countries with local partners to promote culturally sensitive methods to
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104 Papers in Strengths Based Practice strengthen communities’ capacity to deal with conflict in a positive context through utilising indigenous cultural tools such as music, song, dance and folklore. SFCG aims to provide alternatives to violence through the promotion of positive activities. Through the period of armed conflict of Nepal from 1996 significant numbers of youth were involved as soldiers or victims or both. Many young people left their education and villages to join the Maoist army movement, however upon return experienced discrimination and alienation by their families, friends and local communities. A convincing method that has been utilised by SFCG and numerous other organisations to address youth issues refers to Lok Dohori that utilises singing as a medium of intervention. i(should there be a footnote here explaining the definition?) As singing is an significant and integral part of Nepali culture Lok Dohori is a powerful and popular communication tool and is commonly used throughout many forms of youth work in Nepal. Originally a lover’s courting duet between a female and male singing group with accompanied dances, the duet creates a collaborative ‘call and answer’ dynamic that can emerge as an unstructured musical dialogue in rhyme between two groups. It is such an effective method is has been utilised previously by Maoist groups to spread their message and propaganda with much success (D’Errico, 2009, p. 12). On the basis of Dohori programs SFCG has set up an extensive youth network throughout rural areas of Nepal (SFCG, 2011). Outcomes SFCG continues to utilise this traditional process in rural areas of Nepal to facilitate positive interaction between younger and older generations in communities that have been fragmented by the armed civil conflict. Using simple language this musical conversation is an accessible and adaptable medium that requires few resources or professional training from the group mentors. Dohori promotes inclusiveness and provides a supported space for participants to creatively express themselves whilst reinforcing traditional culture and ritual harmony. Such songs refer to notions of love, marriage, harvesting and valued rituals of society. SFCG encourages youth to take
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