America the imperialist now that we have evaluated

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America the IMPERIALIST Now that we have evaluated the trends of American foreign policy and how America played the role of the Savior and the Restorer, we can see how these roles transformed into imperialist policies. As noted earlier, free trade and freedom of the seas clearly favor America in terms of economic profits and gains. Servan-Schreiber acknowledges this by stating, “the free exchange policy opens an enormous free trade zone and an industrial market of global scope to American industry, but where in all this is there any sign of European power?” (Schreiber, 104). These concepts brought forth by Wilson’s Fourteen Points and revisited by the Atlantic Charter display America’s shift towards Imperialist policy over the years. The roots of the Cold War highlight this shift from the Savior and the Restorer to the Imperialist. The Yalta Conference of February 1945 brought together Churchill, Roosevelt, and Stalin and divided Germany into three parts. Charles de Gaulle, the
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French Prime Minister in the 1960’s, stated that the Yalta Conference started the Cold Way by dividing the world into two powers—USSR and US. He writes, “Since Yalta, the global game has been restricted to two partners. But ever since these two hegemonic powers divided the world into two camps, liberty, equality, and fraternity have found no place” (de Gaulle, 228). Thus, as America was partaking in her role as the Restorer, she ended up becoming an Imperialist by attempting to divide the world between herself and the Soviet Union. This division started the Cold War, and as de Gaulle noted, impeded on French culture and liberty. Lastly and most importantly, Nikolai Novikov, a Soviet ambassador to the US, declares that America is preparing for world domination. On September 27, 1946 Novikov sent a telegram to the Soviet foreign ministry warning the Soviet Union of American Imperialism (Kennedy, The US, Cold War, and the American Diplomatic Tradition , 5/2/02). Novikov opens his telegram by stating, “The foreign policy of the United States, which reflects the imperialist tendencies of American monopolistic capital, is characterized in the postwar period by a striving for world supremacy” (Novikov, 401). This quotation ties together the roles that American foreign policy has taken on since post World War II; America’s monopolistic expansion (the Restorer) reflects imperialist tendencies (the Imperialist). Starting from World War I and ending with the Cold war, American foreign policy appeared to have good intentions by acting as the Savior and the Restorer in many instances. However, as time passed and the Cold war emerged, American foreign policy shifted towards imperialist tendencies which consisted of tailoring plans towards American interests, entering WWII only to retaliate against Japan, and investing in
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France through monopolistic expansion. America did indeed save the world for democracy and restore economic stability in Europe; however, in doing so, America abused her role as the Savior and the Restorer and thus acquired the label as the Imperialist.
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