The buddhist orientation to the world expressed in

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– The Buddhist orientation to the world expressed in four propositions: 1) Suffering: all things are temporary and transient; 2) The origin of suffering: We desire permanence despite our knowledge of transience; 3) The end of suffering: It is possible to stop desiring; 4) The Eightfold Path: can achieve the end of desire and therefore of suffering and rebirth.Kensho– A Japanese Buddhist term for enlightenment, with the specific connotation of an initialglimpse into enlightenment, rather than the achievement of full Buddha-hood.Koan– A story, statement, or dialogue used in Zen practice to test a student’s progress.Mahayana– literally “Great Vehicle” – a tradition of Buddhism prevalent in China, Tibet, Korea, and Japan, emphasizing the nonduality of all things, includingenlightenment (which is therefore nothing different from ordinary consciousness).Roshi– A Zen teacherSatori– A Japanese Buddhist term for enlightenment, seeing one’s true nature as transient and conditioned. Often used interchangeably with kensho.Siddhartha Gautama– The founder of Buddhism. Also known as Shakyamuni Buddha, the sage of the Shakya clan. Lived and taught in India, perhaps circa 500-300 BCE; Buddhism spread outwards after his death to Southeast Asia and East Asia.Sunyata– Emptiness. A central concept developed and understood differently in varying Buddhist traditions.Theravada– The oldest form of Buddhism, conceiving of enlightenment as a transcendent state different from ordinary consciousness, and therefore not to be seen as a means to the improvement of life. Prevalent in Southeast Asia (Cambodia, Laos, Burma, Thailand).Zazen– The sitting meditation characteristic of the Zen type of Buddhism.Zen– literally “meditation,” covering both a variety of types of meditation as well as the school of Mahayan Buddhism that adopts them.Zendo– A place set up for zazen.Catholic VocabularyBeatification– “Being made blessed,” one of the stages by which a dead person is canonized (recognized as a saint) in Catholicism Catholic– Literally meaning “universal,” and used in that sense by several Christian churches, this term is also applied to those recognizing the authority of the Holy See under the Bishop or Pope of Rome, and as such members of the Catholic Church.Eucharist– The Christian practice of receiving bread and wine as the body and blood of Christ;
in Catholicism, transubstantiation is taken to literally transform the substance of the holy food.Host– The consecrated bread or wafer that forms one part of the Eucharist.Incarnation– The belief that the second person of the divine Trinity, God-the-Son, became incarnate as a human being in the person of Jesus Christ.Mass– The prayer service that centers on the Eucharist; the name derives from the Latin missaand relates to the missionary mission of the Church.Sacrament– A ritual that publicly signifies God’s presence and publicly demonstrates the flow of God’s grace to those who participate with the proper intention; in Catholicism, there are sevensacraments.Sin

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