Now the GHP would say 30000 happiness to this 1 horrific and unspeakable pain a

Now the ghp would say 30000 happiness to this 1

This preview shows page 26 - 28 out of 108 pages.

her until they die. Now the GHP would say 30,000 happiness’ to this 1 horrific and unspeakable pain a year would indicate that this society and this arrangement would be ethical and that this practice would be the ethical thing to do, but I think most people will take pause and ask themselves if this would be so. Perhaps there is something wrong with utilitarianism and producing pleasure for the most is not the end-all of life. Before we jump to this conclusion, brilliant Utilitarian’s have taken to add nuance to the ethical theory to help it account for these sticky issues. -By the way this last case is the allegorical example of the CIA’s rendition and torture programs post 9/11. Section 2 - Utilitarian Add on #1 - Qualitative Division of Pleasures: Bentham’s Categories and Mill’s distinction between The Higher and the Lower Now we made one mistake up to this point in the name of presentation-simplicity, and so at this juncture I’d like to loop back into an important aspect of Utilitarian’s and their account of pleasure. Notice that up until now we have been treating pleasure monolithically, taking it and pain, as one thing, and in so doing we have completely missed qualitative and categorical differences in and between different types of pleasure. Such distinctions are important because they augment how we will come to think of the algorithms we create with our Hedonistic calculus. When discussing pleasure Jeremy Bentham makes a series of important distinctions. These categories of pleasure are crucial to understanding pleasure and essential for understanding how to properly evaluate the degree and status of X-pleasure or pain within the algorithm of our Hedonistic Calculus. In this sense Bentham insists that when evaluating pleasure we must look at it in terms of (a) Intensity – What Degree of Intensity or Force is the Pleasure/Pain measured (b) Duration – How Long are the distinct Pleasures/Pains to Last for (c) Productiveness – What Additional Pleasures or Pains are Produced by the Given Pleasure/Pain (d) Purity – How Pure/Impure is the Specific Pleasure/Pain, How mixed, muted, and deep is the pleasure (e) Extent – What is the full range of the events effect, is it a more serious or impactful pleasure/pain. Taking this into account adds an instant degree of sophistication and complexity to our different calculations. Take the case of Joe the burglar. Joe really loves looting and stealing, I mean he gets a real kick out of gripping people out of their sh… er… stuff. Now Joe wants to go a robbing one night and right before he heads out the door his roommate Johnny Mill yells you know that’s 15 to 20 26
Image of page 26
man? Joe stops – remembers his ethics class and says yeah lets see: 3 hours of super intense pleasure, which will produce more pleasure of me selling my stolen goods and buying that new piano, the pleasure is pretty pure, I mean robbing feels awesome, living right on the edge, and yeah I feel kinda bad now and again, but they are rich people anyway. Now what if I get caught? Well that’s going to be super intensely
Image of page 27
Image of page 28

You've reached the end of your free preview.

Want to read all 108 pages?

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

Stuck? We have tutors online 24/7 who can help you get unstuck.
A+ icon
Ask Expert Tutors You can ask You can ask You can ask (will expire )
Answers in as fast as 15 minutes