Roles of marriage and extended family vary across racial ethnic groups African

Roles of marriage and extended family vary across

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Roles of marriage and extended family vary across racial-ethnic groups African American Families Greater % of single parent families than any other group o 72% of black children are both to unmarried mothers o More than ½ of all black family households are headed by single parent Decline in marriage rates has dropped more for blacks than for other groups Explaining the trends: o Not due to differential morals, values, or proclivities towards marriage, parenting, etc. o Institutional racism & legacy of slavery: Blacks are more disadvantaged economically Shortage of men: for every 3 unmarried women, there is 1 man with earnings above the poverty line Mass incarceration of black men and effects of drugs and violence o Urban poverty & residential segregation Creation of residential segregation through formal and informal practices (redlining and preferential home mortgages for white families) Deindustrialization contributed to unemployment, urban decline, and higher residential segregation (white flight) Family Resilience: o Economic hardship even after slavery kept the traditional nuclear family out of the reach of most African Americans o Black family as resilient and adaptive in the face of discrimination, migration, poverty, etc. American Indian Families Kinship networks important for sharing resources and conferring identity Remain economically disadvantaged (similar to blacks) Hispanic Families As such variation within the group (Mexicans, Puerto Ricans, Cubans, etc) as between Hispanics and other groups Cohabitation more common, similar to marriage Familism – often spoken of in reference of Hispanic families o Generally the idea is you put the needs of your family above yourself Transnational families o Where dad lives in Mexico while the other parent lives in the US for work o More common currently in Hispanics Asian American Families
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Chapter 3 cont. & Notes from Readings Intermarriage Marriage between members of different racial or ethnic groups Indicator of social distance – the level of acceptance that members of one group have toward members of another group Loving v. Virginia (1967) Never illegal for Hispanics and whites There is more social distance between blacks and whites as indicated by the fact that this has been the most prominent laws between marriage of the two Until 1967 states with laws against marriage up until this case: Alabama, Arkansas, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, north Carolina, south Carolina, Oklahoma, Texas,
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