By 1948 dp leader samuel gringauz stated sourly in

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By 1948 DP leader Samuel Gringauz stated sourly in the American-Jew- ish journal Commentary that “Jewish survivors in German DP camps are an obstacle to Cold War reconciliation with Germany. . . . They are still in acute conflict with the nation which Allied occupation policy wants to make into an ally.” 31 For antifascists involved in postwar reconstruction and relief efforts, such as Bartley Crum of the Anglo-American Committee of In- quiry on Palestine, which investigated conditions in the DP camps, and Ira H irschmann, Fiorello La Guardia’s personal UNRRA representative, who 28 Samuel Gringauz, “Our New German Policy and the DPs: Why Immediate Resettle- ment Is Imperative,” Commentary 5 (1948): 510. In general, see also Dinnerstein. 29 Zorach Wahrhaftig, “Life in Camps 6 Months after Liberation,” November 27, 1945, in A rchives of the Holocaust , 9:134; Wahrhaftig, Uprooted , 39. For case studies of relations between Jewish DPs and the local German population in Landsberg, see Angelika Eder, “Jüdische Displaced Persons im deutschen Alltag: Eine Regionalstudie 1945–1950,” Fritz Bauer Jahrbuch (1997), 163–87; and D. Kohlmannslehner, “Das Verhältnis von deutschen und jüdischen Displaced Persons in Lager Lampertheim 1945–1949,” paper, Fritz Bauer Institut Archives, Frankfurt am Main. 30 Contemporary critics regularly blamed American GI and officer contact with German women for the conciliatory policies and antipathy toward Jewish DPs. This is a complicated theme that deserves much more analysis; German women did exercise real influence in the early postwar years not only through their sexual relationships with the occupiers but also in their positions as translators and clerical workers. 31 Gringauz, 508–14, esp. 508. H e sees the period from the fall of 1945 until the sum- mer of 1947 as a “golden age” (509).
302 A T I N A G R O S S M A N N distrusted the Germans and mourned the demise of the alliance with the Soviet Union, the poor treatment of the DPs and denial of emigration to Palestine and elsewhere were just another aspect of a dangerous policy that coddled the Germans and corrupted the occupiers. Especially liberal and leftist Americans, including a significant number of former German-Jews now stationed in Germany, saw the turn toward reconciliation and recovery for Germany as a source of future fascism. The new agenda of “business before democracy” persecuted former resisters and punished the victims by keeping them locked away in DP camps rather than supporting their desire to begin a new life in Palestine, which many officials had discovered on official tours to be a “miracle of orange groves and olive trees.” 32 Outrage at the treatment of Jewish DPs and pro-Zionism were thus frequently linked to bitterness over the Cold War and the sacrifice of de-Nazification and real democracy in the name of anti-Communism and rebuilding Germany.

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