Some examples are fisted below White coronet White pastern White fetlock White

Some examples are fisted below white coronet white

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Some examples are fisted below: White coronet White pastern White fetlock White half cannon White to knee, to hock, to hind quarter etc. White patch on coronet. Its location must be specified: anterior, lateral, medial. posterior. White ring around limb: does not extend down to the coronet. 3. The presence of coloured spots in white marks should be recorded. Black spots in a white coronet are referred to as Ermine marks. 4. Hooves: Any variation in the hoot pigment should be noted, especially if the horse has no other special characteristics. C. The Body All white markings and any other markings must be indicated with reference to their anatomical position. For example, permanent marks such as scars, saddle marks, bridle marks, collar marks, girth marks, other harness marks, bandage marks etc…
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9 III Other Peculiarities 1. Peculiarities of the head Some examples are listed below: Wall-eye: Lack of pigmentation of the eye loss of an eye Dental irregularities; e,g. the absence of an incisor tooth either from accident or defective dental development. Parrot mouth: projection of upper jaw Nicked ears Fractured nasal bone Unusual muzzle colour (e.g. darker or lighter than normal body colour). Lop ears 2. Peculiarities of the coat Grey-ticked: Where white hairs are sparsely distributed through the coat or any part of the body. Flecked: Where small collections of white hairs occur distributed irregularly in any part of the body. . The degrees of flecking may be described by the terms "heavily flecked" or "lightly flecked". Black or dark marks: this term should be used to describe small areas of black or dark hairs among the basic (lighter) body colour. Spots: Where small, more or less circular, collections of hairs differing from the general body colour occur, distributed in various parts of the body. The position and colour of the spots must be stated. Leopard: A horse can be called leopard if it has many more or less circular collections of hairs differing from the general body colour. Patch: This term should be used to describe any larger well-defined irregular area (not covered by previous definitions) of hairs differing from the general body colour. The colour, shape, position and extent should be described. Zebra Marks: where there is dark or black striping on the limbs, neck or quarters. Withers stripe: zebra band across the withers. List: a dorsal band of black hairs which extends from the withers backwards to the base of the tail. 3. The following should also be mentioned: The Prophet's Thumb Mark: a muscular depression commonly seen on the neck, on the breast or on the point of the shoulder. Branding marks, freeze markings, tattoos or scars. The presence of hairs of different colours in mane and tail should be specified, especially in piebalds and skewbalds. 4. It is important that information detrimental to the horse is not included in the narrative or on the diagram unless it is essential for the identification of the horse.
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10 Section III - The Diagram I General 1. The diagram must be filled in using both a red ballpoint pen and a black ballpoint pen .
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  • Fall '15
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