unnecessary impasse and result in a better outcome for you Danielsen et al 2016

Unnecessary impasse and result in a better outcome

This preview shows page 2 - 4 out of 5 pages.

unnecessary impasse and result in a better outcome for you (Danielsen et al., 2016). Reference Danielsen, R.D., Potenza LI, A.D., & Onieal, M. (2016). Negotiating the professional contract. Clinician Reviews, 26(12), 28-33. Retrieved from: ? vid=7&sid=c8512e59-dee9-4ce3-b2e9-a45f1f1483d0%40sessionmgr4007 Week 3 Part 2 TD As revenue generators, NPs must be aware of how their work contributes to the overall revenue of the clinical practice. You see 20 patients per day on average, and take call every third weekend. According to Buppert (2011), an NP who sees 15 patients per day at $56 per patient visit, on average, brings in $840 per day. Allowing 1 week off for continuing education, 1 week off for illness, and 4 weeks off for vacation, this NP will bring in $193,200 a year, potentially. However, not all bills are paid. With a 90% collection rate—a reasonable collection rate for an efficient practice—this NP actually will bring in $173,800 per year. An NP who sees 24 patients per day will bring in $1344 per day, or $309,120 per year in accounts receivable. With a 90% collection rate, this NP will bring $278,208 to the practice (Buppert, 2011). In this scenario, what are you “worth” to the practice? Use logical reasoning and provide evidence based rationales for your decisions. Keep in mind that your negotiation terms and conditions must be within the legal scope of practice for an ANP. In practice, a nurse practitioner’s (NP) productivity is based on factors such as time devoted to productive actions or skills, and the efficiency of time spent with patients. These variables can be measured to a degree and provide NPs with useful information on
Image of page 2
whether they are productive health care providers, and most importantly, if they serve the community efficiently and safely (Rhoads, Ferguson & Langford, 2006). One’s “worth” or productivity is the measure of the work produced during a determined period. It becomes a measure of efficiency when it includes factors such as time, complexity, and the number of clients seen in a given period. However, numbers can be deceiving. If a nurse practitioner is very productive, but the quality of his or her work lacks, the long-term consequences may be negative (Rhoads et al., 2006). Looking it from a different perspective, when determining what a nurse practitioner is “worth” to the practice we can calculate the amount of revenue the primary care nurse practitioner can generate, using the following formula provided by Dr. Carolyn Buppert (Buppert, 2011).
Image of page 3
Image of page 4

You've reached the end of your free preview.

Want to read all 5 pages?

  • Fall '15
  • ?

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture