Cut the tube to the required length Ream the cut end and remove the burrs of

Cut the tube to the required length ream the cut end

This preview shows page 67 - 70 out of 81 pages.

- Cut the tube to the required length; - Ream the cut end and remove the burrs of the tubing; - Clean the tubing and the fitting socket with sand cloth; - Apply flux to the tube end and fitting socket; - Assemble the pipe and fitting; - Apply heat to the tubing first, but only momentarily, and then to the fitting until solder melts; - Remove the flame and feed solder to the joint until a ring of solder appears at the end of the fitting; - Remove excess solder with a cloth while the solder is still pasty, leaving a fillet around the end of the fitting as it cools. b. Compression Joints - Cut the tube to the required length; - Ream the cut end and remove the burrs of the tubing; - A swaged end formed on the tube and the nut is put on the tube before forming a swaged end; - Insert tube end into fitting; - Tighten cap nut with a spanner. soft copper ring tightening nut
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Construction Workshop Page 67 IC Professional Training 4.3.5.3 Plastic Pipe Joints a. Rubber Ring Joint - this joint may be either of integral socket design or it may consist of a separate sleeve-type coupling. - Clean dirt and grit from socket; - Insert the rubber so that it seats evenly in the socket; - Clean the spigot back to reference mark and apply lubricant to chamfer; - Align spigot and socket and push pipe home until reference mark is just visible at socket mouth. b. Solvent Weld Joint - solvent weld joints are made by solvent bonding, producing a welded system much like a metal welded system. - Cut the pipe squarely, remove the burrs and slightly chamfer the external pipe edge; - Degrease the spigot and socket; - Apply the solvent cement as pre-marked; - While the surface is still wet, push the spigot home into the socket with a slight twisting motion and remove the excess cement with soft cloth. 4.4 Sanitary Appliances Installations 4.4.1 The use of water in building and other purposes is made possible and convenient by the provision of sanitary appliances which are of appropriate form and have water supply either from the main, or from hot or cold water storage vessels. It is essential that the supply water is not contaminated by foul water and for this reason in most cases the taps
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Construction Workshop Page 68 IC Professional Training are designed to discharge above the flooding level of the appliance, to prevent the risk of back siphonage of foul water into the supply pipe. 4.4.2 Materials Used in Sanitary Appliance Glazed Earthenware - for sinks and w.c. pans - well to form complicated shapes - relatively cheap - produces products of good colour Glazed Fireclay - produces a tough appliance - resistant to knocks and hard wear - for urinals, sinks and w.c. pans in publics Vitreous China - used for all types of appliances - relatively weak - non-absorbent even when it is unglazed - various colours may be obtained Mild Steel - galvanised or enamelled - used for toughs and sinks - relatively cheap Stainless Steel - used for sinks, wash basins, w.c. pans etc.
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