Recovery actions specific to king island provide

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Recovery Actions specific to King Island Provide information and extension support to the King Island Natural Resource Management committee, King Island council, Government agencies and the local community on the location, significance and management of known subpopulations and areas of potential habitat; Negotiate with landowners in the Yellow Rock area to ensure at least two subpopulations are formally protected. Encourage landholders to consider protection of habitat through a vegetation management agreement or conservation covenant under the Tasmanian Nature Conservation Act 2002 ; Encourage landowners to fence off vegetation supporting the species to prevent damage by stock; Survey areas of suitable habitat in the Yellow Rock land system and, should new subpopulations be located, identify and address any threatening issues; Determine the extent and impact of onion weed and White Italian Snail in the vicinity of known subpopulations and treat if deemed necessary. Measures to eradicate onion weed or White Italian Snail should be considered by the King Island Natural Resource Management Group in a whole-of-island context; Monitor known subpopulations biennially to determine the level of recruitment and/or plant loss; if monitoring identifies a decline in subpopulations, and then adopt an adaptive management approach to minimise the impacts of threats. King Island Biodiversity Management Plan 142
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Tmesipteris parva (small forkfern) Description Tmesipteris parva is a small fern in the Psilotaceae family, known in Tasmania from Flinders Island and King Island. The species occurs in sheltered gullies, where it grows on the trunks of treeferns. Reproduction is by spore. Tmesipteris parva is a pendulous epiphyte, typically less than 10 cm long, with an unbranched green stem (Plate 8; Duncan & Isaac 1986). Leaves are flattened into one plane and are crowded along the stem (4 to 5 per cm). Leaves are 9 to 14 mm long, soft to firm, simple, gently curved and lanceolate, with acute to shortly pointed tips. The fertile region of the plant may be near the tip, middle, or towards the base of the stem. A capsule-like structure consisting of two fused sporangia (= synangium) occurs at the tip of a short lateral branch, in the axil of paired, leaf-like appendages that are smaller and narrower than the sterile leaves. The synangium is thick-walled, brown and brittle, splitting across the top. Spores are numerous. Confusing species: Tmesipteris parva may be distinguished from the other forkferns in Tasmania, Tmesipteris obliqua and Tmesipteris elongata, by its rounded synangia, its relatively short stems and small crowded leaves (Duncan & Isaac 1986, Garrett 1996). Current Status Commonwealth Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 : Not Listed Tasmanian Threatened Species Protection Act 1995 : vulnerable Plate 8. Tmesipteris parva : habit (Photograph: Matthew Larcombe) Figure 7. Tmesipteris parva : King Island distribution King Island Biodiversity Management Plan 143
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Existing Conservation Measures Targeted surveys for
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  • Fall '14
  • The Hours, ........., Threatened species, Bass Strait, Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999, King Island

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