Using the implicit association test to assess gender

This preview shows page 24 - 25 out of 25 pages.

We have textbook solutions for you!
The document you are viewing contains questions related to this textbook.
What is Psychology?: Foundations, Applications, and Integration
The document you are viewing contains questions related to this textbook.
Chapter 7 / Exercise 2
What is Psychology?: Foundations, Applications, and Integration
Pastorino
Expert Verified
2. Using the Implicit Association Test to assess gender stereotypes. Brian Nosek, Mahzarin Banaji, and Anthony Greenwald (2002) used a very different method to assess implicit gender stereotypes. Specifically, they examined the gender stereotypes that mathematics is associated with males and that the arts are associated with females. Suppose that they had asked their research participants (college students at Yale University) an explicit question, such as: ‘‘Is mathmore strongly associated with males than with females?’’ When research is conducted with college students like these, the students are most likely to answer ‘‘No.’’ After all, when students are asked an explicit question like this, they have time to be analytical and to recall that a ‘‘Yes’’ answer would not be socially appropriate.Instead of an explicit measure, Nosek and his colleagues used the Implicit Association Test (e.g., Greenwald & Nosek, 2001; Greenwald et al., 1998; Nosek et al., 2007). An implicit task asks people to perform a task, but the participants do not know what the task is supposed to measure. The Implicit Association Test (IAT) is based on the principle that people can mentally pair two related words together much more easily than they can pair two unrelated words.Specifically, when participants worked on the IAT, they sat in front of a computer screen that presented a series of words.On a typical trial—where the pairings were consistent with gender stereotypes—the participant would be told to press the key on the left if the word was related to math (e.g., calculus or numbers) and also if the word was related to males (e.g., uncle or son). This same participant would be told to press the key on the right if the word was related to the arts (e.g., poetry or dance) and also if the word was related to females (e.g., aunt or daughter).Throughout the study, participants were urged to respond as quickly as possible, so that they would not consciously consider their responses. When completing the IAT, people with strong gender stereotypes would think that math and males fit in the same category, whereas the arts and females would fit in a different category. Therefore, their responses should be quick for this first portion of the task.Then the instructions shifted so that the pairings were now inconsistent with gender stereotypes. Now, on a typical trial, the participant would press the left key if the word was related to math and also if the word was related to females. Also,the participant would press the right key if the word was related to the arts and also if the word was related to males. People with strong gender stereotypes should have difficulty associating math-related terms with women and arts-related terms with men. Their responses should therefore be much slower for this second part of the task.Nosek and his coauthors (2002) found that the students responded significantly faster to the stereotype-consistent pairings (the first task), compared to the stereotype- inconsistent pairings (the second task). In other words, most of
We have textbook solutions for you!
The document you are viewing contains questions related to this textbook.
What is Psychology?: Foundations, Applications, and Integration
The document you are viewing contains questions related to this textbook.
Chapter 7 / Exercise 2
What is Psychology?: Foundations, Applications, and Integration
Pastorino
Expert Verified

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture