Encourage the landholders to consider protection of

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Negotiate with landholders to ensure the Deep Lagoons site is protected. Encourage the landholders to consider protection of habitat through a vegetation management agreement or conservation covenant under the Tasmanian Nature Conservation Act 2002 ; Maintain the stock-proof fence at the Deep Lagoons site — check condition annually; Survey areas of suitable habitat (e.g., the Blowhole Creek area) and, should new subpopulations be located, identify and address any threatening issues; Monitor the known sites biennially to determine the level of recruitment and/or plant loss; if monitoring identifies a decline in subpopulations, then adopt an adaptive management approach to minimise the impacts of threats. King Island Biodiversity Management Plan 125
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Pimelea axiflora subsp. axiflora (bootlace bush) Description Pimelea axiflora subsp . axiflora is a woody shrub in the Thymelaeaceae family. Within Tasmania the species is known only from King Island. The tough bark of the species was used by early settlers in Victoria for bootlaces, hence the common name. Pimelea axiflora subsp . axiflora is an open, erect or gracefully arching shrub to 6 m high. Its stems are reddish and mostly hairless, though younger stems may be pubescent. Leaves are narrow, dark green (paler below) and hairless, and 2.5 to 9 cm long. They are arranged opposite each other along the stem and have a prominent midrib and veins on their underside. The species is dioecious, with male and female flowers on separate plants. The male (staminate) flowers are tubular, 3 to 4 mm long, white or cream in colour and hairy on the outside, and have two protruding stamens. The female (pistillate) flowers are smaller, the tube having short erect lobes that enlarge and persist around the dry fruit. The flowers occur in sessile clusters of 4 to 8 in the leaf axils. Flowers are surrounded by small, green or brown papery bracts. The fruit opens to release small seeds. [Description from Curtis 1967 and Entwisle 1996] Pimelea axiflora subsp . axiflora has been observed to recruit in the absence of fire, and is thought to be an obligate seeder. Butterflies and long-tongued flies are the most likely pollination vector for the species. The species flowers from June to December, peaking in September and November, though it may be identified at any time of year due to its distinctive habit and foliage (Plate 5). Confusing species: Pimelea axiflora subsp. axiflora may be confused with Pimelea drupacea . The latter is a straggly shrub to 3 m high, with flowers in terminal clusters and succulent black fruit. No other subspecies of Pimelea axiflora occur in Tasmania. Current Status Commonwealth Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 : Not Listed Tasmanian Threatened Species Protection Act 1995 : endangered King Island Biodiversity Management Plan 126
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Plate 5. Pimelea axiflora subsp.
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