Up to 700 people can be saved a year for organ transplants Many people who are

Up to 700 people can be saved a year for organ

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Up to 700 people can be saved a year for organ transplants. Many people who are dying and have had their life snuffed out want to help others live. They don't want other people to go through the same painful life that they had too. Incurable diseases will run
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Kennedy, 6 ramped on the body and will cause organ failure and the destruction of the body. If people who wanted to be euthanized were, they could donate their organs to other dying people who need them to save a life. If euthanasia is left illegal the organs will be ruined and infected with disease and no one could use them. No one will be saved because you didn't allow that person who wanted to be euthanized to die peacefully and the way they wanted. Vital organs can be preserved from the euthanized patients and given to patients who can be saved. The needs of the living should be put above those who are dying. Especially those who want to die. Euthanasia should be legalized to free people from the pain that their life is causing them. It will save hundreds of lives and grant a dying person their last wish. Patients want to be free from the body that is constraining them and holding them back, allowing them to be euthanized would free them from that body. Just like every argument euthanasia has its drawback but the good outweighs the bad. People with chronic illnesses should have the option to do this if worst comes to worst, but it should not be the first solution to every problem, and this must be done with responsibility. Euthanasia must be the last resort if used at all and only for patients who directly ask for it or if they are in a coma only the direct family should decide what to do. Never should the hospital decide they should remove life support. If I was dying painfully I would want someone to end my life and help me through the struggling, I wouldn't want my family to have to worry about me anymore and know that I am no longer in pain and I am in a happier place.
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Kennedy, 7 Works Cited Cees, Ruijs. "Depression and explicit requests for euthanasia in end-of-life cancer patients in primary care in the Netherlands: a longitudinal, prospective study." Family Practice 14.6 Aug 2011: 393-399. Print. Chambaere, Kenneth. "Physician-assisted deaths under the euthanasia law in Belgium: a population-based survey. " Canadian Medical Association Journal 182.9 2010: 895-901. Print. Dees, Marianne. "Unbearable suffering of patients with a request for euthanasia or physician-assisted suicide: an integrative review." Psycho-Oncology 19.4 Apr 2010: 339-352. Print. Fenigsen , Richard. "Other People's Lives: Reflections on Medicine, Ethics, and Euthanasia: Part Two: Medicine Versus Euthanasia." Issues in Law & Medicine 26.3 Spring 2011: 239-279. Print. Randall, Fiona, Robin Downie. "Assisted suicide and voluntary euthanasia: role contradictions for physicians. " Clinical Medicine Volume 10 Aug 2010: 323-325. Print. Sullivan, Stephen. "The right to die: a discussion of 'rational suicide. '" Mental Health Practice 14.6 Mar 2011: 32-34. Print. Yun, Young. "Attitudes of cancer patients, family caregivers, oncologists and members of the general public toward critical interventions at the end of life of terminally ill patients." Canadian Medical Association Journal 183.10 July 2011: 673-679. Print.
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