Is no one model american from this viewpoint the

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is no one model American.” From this viewpoint, the differences among the nation’s citizens are a positive force. Remember, emphasizing cultural pluralism does not mean you support a philosophy aimed at cultural, social, or economic separation. Depending on how we define cultural pluralism, it may or may not stress integration in cultural, social, or economic matters. Generally, it lies somewhere between total assimilation on the one hand and strict separation of ethnic or racial groups on the other hand. Cultural pluralism, particularly in education, is more important than ever before as the United States becomes transformed into what observers call the first “universal nation.” 12-3a Multicultural Instruction One key area in multicultural education concerns instructional approaches for teaching students with differing ethnic and racial backgrounds. Several of the most frequently discussed approaches address student learning styles, recognition of
dialect differences, bilingual education, and multiethnic curriculum. Student Learning Styles In Chapter 11 , Social Class, Race, and School Achievement, we briefly described behavioral patterns and learning styles that appear to correlate with students’ socioeconomic status and, perhaps, with their race or ethnicity. We also mentioned attempts to modify instruction to accommodate different learning styles. One good example of research on this subject was provided by Vera John-Steiner and Larry Smith, who worked with Pueblo Indian children in the Southwest. They concluded that schooling for these children would be more successful if it emphasized personal communication in tutorial (face-to-face) situations. Other observers of Native American classrooms have reported that achievement rose substantially when teachers interacted with students in culturally appropriate ways (that is, social control was mostly indirect); integrated tribal culture into the curriculum while emphasizing mastery of state standards; and/or avoided putting students in competitive situations. Similarly, several researchers have reported that cooperative learning arrangements are particularly effective with some Mexican American students whose cultural background deemphasizes competition. Analysts also have examined research on the performance of Asian American students. Several observers believe that certain subgroups of Asian students (for example, Koreans and Vietnamese) tend to be nonassertive in the classroom and that this reluctance to participate may hinder their academic growth, particularly with respect to verbal skills. (However, research suggests that such behavioral patterns diminish or disappear as Asian American students become more assimilated within US society.) In addition, Asian American students can be harmed by a stereotype indicating that they are all part of a model minority who have no serious problems in school.

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