Making Jam, jellies and the fruit preserves.pdf

Be sure to test for pectin content acid and doneness

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Be sure to test for pectin content, acid and doneness. For very ripe or overly ripe fruit, follow a recipe for added pectin.
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Place firm fruit in a flat-bottomed saucepan and crush to start juice flow. Add a little cold water: Apples and other hard fruits: Add only enough water to cover. Grapes and berries: Use only enough water to prevent scorching. Bring to a boil on high heat. Stir to prevent scorching. Reduce heat. Cook until just soft: Apples and other hard fruits need 20 to 25 minutes, depend- ing on the firmness of the fruit. Grapes and berrie s need 10 minutes or less. Do not overcook. Excess boiling destroys pectin, flavor and color. Pour cooked fruit into a damp jelly bag and suspend over a large bowl to drain juice.The clearest jelly comes from juice that has dripped through a jelly bag without pressing or squeezing. Juice can also be extracted from either firm or soft fruit with a steam juicer. Steam juicers, such as Mehu-Liisa* are available online at or 1-800-728-1238. A fruit press, or manual juicer, is not recommended for extracting juice for jelly. Jelly without added pectin Jellies made without added pectin require less sugar — 1 / 4 cup less per cup of fruit juice — than do those with added pectin. But the longer cooking process yields less jelly per cup of juice. To make jelly without added pectin, be sure to test for doneness. Testing fruit juice for pectin There are two reliable ways to find out if fruit juice contains enough natural pectin to make good jelly without adding pectin.The cooking test is easier, and very reliable. Cooking test Measure 1 / 3 cup juice and 1 / 4 cup sugar into a small saucepan. Heat slowly, stirring constantly until all the sugar is dissolved. Bring the mixture to a boil, and boil rapidly until it gives the spoon or sheet test for doneness (see next page). Pour the jelly into a clean, hot jelly glass or sauce dish, and cool. If the cooled mixture gels, your fruit juice contains enough natural pectin. If not, use a recipe calling for added pectin. M A K I N G J A M S , J E L L I E S & F R U I T P R E S E R V E S 25 * Reference to products or companies is not intended to endorse them, nor to exclude others that may be similar. Examples are listed as a convenience to readers.
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Alcohol test Add 1 tablespoon juice to 1 table- spoon of 70 percent rubbing alcohol.To mix, stir or shake a closed container slightly so all the juice comes in contact with the alcohol. Do not taste; this mixture is poisonous. Fruit high in pectin will form a solid jelly-like mass you can pick up with a fork. If the juice shows little clumping, there is not enough pectin for jelly. Discard test results down the drain. Testing fruit juice for acid There is no home test to determine the exact amount of acid present. But you can do a simple comparison taste-test for tartness by mixing: 1 teaspoon bottled lemon juice 3 tablespoons water 1 / 2 teaspoon sugar If your fruit juice does not taste as tart as this mixture, it is not tart enough and needs more acid.
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  • Fall '13
  • DavidWiley

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