Shapes spouted jugs cups decoration mottled red brown

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Shapes: Spouted Jugs Cups Decoration: Mottled, red-brown wash on light background Blobs, circles with some linear decoration on spout Pellets attached to spouts (as eyes?): zoomorphic Technique: Blackened/burnt stick held against pot surface Firing in stages at different temperatures
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HOUSE TOMBS: GOURNIA
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HOUSE TOMBS: MOCHLOS
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Religion By the end of the EBA, peak sanctuaries appear at Iuktas, Zakro, etc (Crete). Evidence for a communal religion. Large numbers of figurines were offered to deities (of unknown identity): whole figurines, body parts, domestic animal figures, especially of clay, bronze, or stone. Rituals involved the use of fire (carbon remains).
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Graveyards located outside settlements Cist graves: shallow rectangles cut into the earth, lined with stones Chamber tombs: stone-built rooms, above ground Tholos tombs: only in central Crete; round stone, built above ground Early Minoan Period: The Dead Cist Grave Chamber Tomb Tholos Tomb
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THOLOS TOMBS MESARA PLAIN
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THOLOS TOMBS KAMILARI (Mesara)
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ODIYITRIA APESOKARI
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THOLOS TOMB KAMILARI Corbelling
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MALIA: CHRYSOLAKKOS CEMETERY Bee Pendant
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RITUAL OBJECTS? (later) Horns of Consecration
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THE DOUBLE AXE
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EBA Achievements Professional understanding of metals and an increase in their distribution and quality. Organized into settled towns. Collective storing and defense (involves agreement on a political system). 1st tentative concept of how conventional symbols may carry messages (carved seals, pot marks). Unfrightened trade over long distances, especially by sea; exposure to new languages and response to alien cultures.
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EBA Crete; Pottery Types EMI (3000-2500) Ayios Onouphrios ware (crème/yellow base with red lines), brought by newcomers from Asia. EMII (2500-2200) Vasiliki ware (variegated mottled surface: imitation of stone ware?)
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Crete, Ayios Onouphrios: jugs, EM I (c. 2500 BCE)
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Shapes: Round-bottomed jugs Decoration: Dark patterns on light background Hatchings, stripes, diagonal lines, lozenges Aghios Onouphrios (EM I) Pottery
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Clay tablet with Minoan hieroglyphics Clay sealings Stone Seal EARLY MINOAN WRITING
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EARLY MINOAN PERIOD: SUMMARY Increase in social organization and administration Widening of long-distance trade relationships Growing complexity of religious practices Highly developed craftsmanship Written documentation, probably for administrative purposes Growing conception of  Minoan  architectural style
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CYCLADES
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THE EARLY CYCLADIC  PERIOD
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  • Winter '13
  • GeorgeHarrison
  • Minoan civilization, Lerna, Early Minoan Period, Lerna III/late EH, Early Cycladic Period

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