Majority of black abolitionist were ministers in the church They were

Majority of black abolitionist were ministers in the

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than black conventions. Majority of black abolitionist were ministers in the church. They were affiliated with both black and white churches. Pulpits were used in attacking slavery, racial discrimination, proslavery white churches and the American Colonization Society. Black churches were also used as forums for abolitionist to speak out. Black newspapers were not very useful during the movement because they weren’t as influential. The white newspapers published black abolitionist writing so there wasn’t a big use for black newspapers. Eventually they became more predominate in the late 1820s. During the 1840’s growing numbers of black abolitionist were willing to consider forceful action against slavery and many back abolitionists as well as white were exploring new types of antislavery action. Frederick Douglass’s North Star and later on Frederick Douglass Paper were very influential during the movement and attracted more white readers than black. Frederick Douglass believed that black people were a part of a large American nation and that their best prospects for political and economic success lay in the United States He opposed separate black churches and predicted that African-Americans would eventually merge into a greater American identity. 3. Why was the expansion of slavery such a divisive issue? How did westward expansion contribute to the issue of slavery? Discuss the Wilmot Proviso and its implications, along with African Americans and the Gold Rush. Slavery was the most important and divisive issue in 19th-century American politics and society. At the end of the Revolution, the new American nation was divided between the southern states whose economies were heavily dependent on slavery and northern states where slavery was legal but not economically important. Because it would have affected the balance of power in the Senate. At one-point slavery was legal in America from the Carolinas to Massachusetts, but after the American
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Revolution it died in the northern states for lack of profit, and in the immediate years after the Revolution, there were even doubts that it would survive much longer in the south. Proposal to prohibit slavery in any land acquired in the Mexican War, but southern senators, led by John C. Calhoun of South
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