Flows in this model are bidirectional between clients and the server in the

Flows in this model are bidirectional between clients

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Flows in this model are bidirectional, between clients and the server, in the form of requests and responses. 42 FIGURE 4.24 Client–Server Flow Model
Flow Models (Cont…) Hierarchical Client–Server A hierarchical client–server flow model has the characteristics of a client–server flow model but also has multiple layers, or tiers, between servers. 43 FIGURE 4.26 A Hierarchical Client–Server Flow Model
Flow Models (Cont…) 44 FIGURE 4.28 Components of a Climate Modeling Problem FIGURE 4.29 A Hierarchical Client–Server Model for Scientific Visualization
Flow Models (Cont…) Distributed-Computing A distributed-computing flow model can have the inverse of the characteristics of the client– server flow model, or a hybrid of peer-to-peer and client–server flow models. In this model, flows may be primarily between a task manager and its computing devices (like a client–server model) or between the computing devices (like a peer-to-peer model). 45
Flow Models (Cont…) Distributed-Computing (Cont…) 46 FIGURE 4.30 A Distributed-Computing Flow Model
Flow Models (Cont…) 47 FIGURE 4.31 Flows for a Computing Cluster
Flow Models (Cont…) Distributed-Computing (Cont…) Flows in this type of distributed-computing flow model can have the most stringent performance requirements of any of the models. Since computing devices may block (halt their computations) while waiting for information from neighbor devices, the timing of information transfer between computing devices becomes critical. This has a direct impact on the delay and delay variation requirements for the network connecting the devices. 48
Chapter 4 1. Objectives 2. Background 3. Flows 4. Identifying and Developing Flows 5. Data Sources and Sinks 6. Flow Models 7. Flow Prioritization 8. The Flow Specification 9. Example Application of Flow Analysis 10. Conclusions 11. Exercises 49
Flow Prioritization Flow prioritization means ranking flows based on their importance, which can be described in various ways, depending on your environment. Some common prioritizations include: Business objectives and the impact of a flow on the customer’s business Political objectives One or more of the performance requirements of the flow (a subset of capacity, delay, RMA, and quality of service). Security requirements for each flow The numbers of users, applications, and/or devices that a flow serves 50
Flow Prioritization (Cont…) The purpose for prioritizing flows is to determine which flows get the most resources or which flows get resources first. 51 FIGURE 4.33 An Example of Flow Information for Prioritization
Flow Prioritization (Cont…) 52 FIGURE 4.34 Flows Prioritized by the Number of Users Served
Flow Prioritization (Cont…) 53 FIGURE 4.35 Flows Prioritized by Reliability
Chapter 4 1.

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