The projects design might begin with available data

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The project’s design might begin with available data, then McDonald’s marketing researchers can start to ask customers specific questions about their experience.
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Step 2: Designing the Research
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Marketing Research Process Step 3: Collecting the Data Data collection begins only after the research design process. Based on the design of the project, data can be collected from secondary or primary data sources. Secondary data are pieces of information that have been collected prior to the start of the focal research project; includes external and internal data sources. Primary data are those data collected to address specific research needs; includes focus groups, in-depth interviews, and surveys. McDonald’s may choose to sample participants at random to represent their entire customer market. Or they may choose to select the sample on the basis of some characteristic, such as age.
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Secondary Data Data previously collected for any purpose other than the one at hand. Secondary Data
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Sources of Secondary Data Government Agencies Trade and Industry Associations Business Periodicals News Media Internal Corporate Information
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Primary Data Primary Data Information collected for the first time. Can be used for solving the particular problem under investigation.
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Step 3: Collecting the Data
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Marketing Research Process Step 3: Collecting the Data Marketing researchers use various methods of asking questions to measure the issues they are tackling. Exhibit 10.2 page 199 textbook is a hypothetical fast-food survey.
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Marketing Research Process Step 4: Analyzing the Data and Developing Insights To generate meaningful information, researchers analyze and make use of the collected data – raw numbers or other factual information that, on their own, have limited value to marketers. Information results from organizing, analyzing, and interpreting data and putting them into a form that is useful to marketing decision makers. A checkout scanner in the grocery store collects sales data about individual consumer purchases. Not until those data are categorized and examined do they provide information about which products and services were purchased together or how an in- store promotional activity translated into sales.
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Step 4: Analyzing Data and Developing Insights ©Getty Images Converting data into information to explain, predict, and/or evaluate a particular situation.
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Marketing Research Process Step 5: Developing and Implementing an Action Plan The analyst prepares the results and presents them to the appropriate decision makers, who undertake appropriate marketing strategies. A typical marketing research presentation includes an executive summary, the body of the report (which discusses the research objectives, methodology used, and detailed findings), the conclusions, the limitations, and appropriate supplemental tables, figures, and appendixes.
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  • Spring '13
  • Payne
  • Marketing, secondary data

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