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Requirements of a strong argument rsa triangle 8

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Requirements of a strong Argument: RSA Triangle 8 Acceptability of premises Relevancy of premises Sufficiency Requirements of a Strong Argument (cont’d) 1.Premise Acceptability ! Acceptable premises are premises that the intended audience of an argument should accept. ! They are probable, plausible, verifiable, etc. ! An acceptable premise does not necessarily imply that a premise is true.
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Requirements of a Strong Argument (cont’d) ! Logical Consequence ! Even if the premises in an argument are acceptable, they still need to lead to the conclusion. ! Logical consequence in an argument implies that the conclusion follows from its premises in two ways: 2. the premises are relevant to the conclusion; and 3. the premises are sufficient to establish the argument’s conclusion. The A Condition: Acceptable, Unacceptable, or Questionable Premises? ! Premises in an argument are acceptable if ! they don’t require further proof by the intended, or specific, audience, and ! they are acceptable to a universal audience. ! Determining whether a premise is acceptable can lead to three possibilities. 1. The premise is acceptable without further support. 2. The premises is unacceptable. 3. The premises is questionable as is. The A Condition: Conditions of Acceptability 1. Premises may be acceptable by definition, or self- evidently acceptable 2. Premises may be acceptable by observation 3. Premises may be acceptable by common knowledge 4. Premises may be acceptable because they’re reasonably proven in a sub-argument 5. Premises may be acceptable based on the authority of the arguer
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Provisional Acceptance ! Sometimes we accept premises provisionally ! This allows us to suspend the issue of truth (when we do not know whether the premises are accurate/true) and focus on relevancy and sufficiency 13 Exercise 8B, 1 (b–f)
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