Do question 3 mark your choice or choices in question

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Do question 3; mark your choice or choices. In question 3, you should have marked all of the choices. The time of day or night can give you entirely different burning conditions. Safety is affected by the nature of the fuels, anchor points, and escape routes. If the fire is small and not very active, attacking the head may be the best plan. Once we have decided where control lines should be established, we need to determine just how they will be built to effectively stop the fire. We call these determinations the standards for control line construction. On page 9, figure 6 illustrates chances for heat transfer across a control line. If we can anticipate how the heat transfer processes will threaten a control line, we can then establish standards to make the line more secure. Let's review the problems related to heat transfer that affect the standards for control line construction. Under item D, list the following: Radiation across control line, spotting across line,
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crowning originating from surface fire, rolling firebrands, and fire creeping through subsurface organic fuels. Fire can cross a fireline in all of these ways. You will be required to know these items. In figure 7, on the next page, we have illustrated the "black line concept." Many firefighters contend that the only safe fireline is a black line. The concept requires, for safety and security, that we burn out fuels remaining between the constructed line and the main fire to insure that the fireline is not threatened by active fire. This should be normal procedure in line construction. There will be times when burning out is not possible or practical. What should be done in these situations? We'll discuss these, but first please do question 4; mark your choice or choices. In question 4, you should have marked choice 3. To clarify, we'll discuss each of the four choices. In the first situation, fire may not carry through the fuels now, but could they burn later? Many firelines have been lost when fuels started burning inside and spotted across an unattended line. The second choice can threaten firelines should a reburn occur later in the aerial fuels. Depending on the fuels situation, surface fires can dry out aerial fuels, and if weather conditions become severe enough, a crown fire might travel through the same area. Number 3 is generally accepted as a safe practice when the fire perimeter is nearly cold. By carefully feeling out the hot spots on the perimeter, fireline need not be constructed where the fire is dead out. In number 4, if firing out firelines is too hot and dangerous for firefighters, this obviously will not be a safe and secure fireline until some further action is taken. Two solutions to this situation might be to wait for more favorable conditions under which to burn, or to back away and place the control line in a more favorable location.
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  • Spring '04
  • MIchealJenkins
  • Combustion, fuel, Wildfire, fireline, firelines

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