Example season of mists and mellow fruitfulness close

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- Example: Season of mists and mellow fruitfulness, Close bosom-friend of the maturing sun; Conspiring with him how to load and bless With fruit the vines that round the thatch -eves run; To bend with apples the moss’d cottage-trees, And fill all fruit with ripeness to the core; To swell the gourd, and plump the hazel shells With a sweet kernel; to set budding more, And still more, later flowers for the bees, 9. Cacophony: - Definition: noun, a harsh discordance of sound. - Example: A cacophony of hoots, cackles, and wails. - Effects: creates an unpleasant effect and gives the poem a negative tone Poetic Devices and Figurative Language 1. Metaphor: Figure of explication occurring when a comparison made by speaking of one thing in terms of another; an implied comparison between two different things which share at least one attribute in common. · Ex: Her golden hair was a wide plain of soft sand on a sunny day. Effect: creates vivid imagery through connection of a concept to a broader concept 2. Simile: Comparing two unlike things using “like” or “as” · Ex: My cousin Charles is like a young squirrel, full of energy, wit, and agility. Effect: similar to metaphor, creates vivid imagery to make it more memorable and understandable to audience 3. Conceit:
1 Conceit is a figure of speech in which two vastly different objects are likened together with the help of similes or metaphors. Example: Love is like an oil change,” “The broken heart is a damaged china pot.” Effect : Because conceits make unusual and unlikely comparisons between two things, it allows readers to look at things in a new way. Similes and metaphor may explain things vibrantly but they tend to become boring at times because of their predictable nature. Conceits, on the other hand, surprise and shock the readers by making farfetched comparisons. Hence, conceit is used as a tool in literature to develop interest in readers. 4. Personification: · Applying human attributes to a non-human object · The sun shouted its greeting as it rose above the earth to welcome the new day with open arms. Effect: helps readers relate to non-human objects 5. Apostrophe: · punctuation mark, and sometimes a diacritical mark used to: mark the omission of one or more letters (as in the contraction of do not to don't ), mark a possessive case (as in the eagle's feathers , or in one month's time ), or mark the plural of written items that are not words established in English orthography (as in P's and Q's ). · Ex: don’t; eagle’s feathers 6. Hyperbole: · deliberate exaggeration of a person, thing, quality, event to emphasize a point external to the object of exaggeration; intentional exaggeration for rhetorical effect. · Ex: "So first of all, let me assert my firm belief that the only thing we have to fear is fear itself ." –FDR First Inaugural Address 7. Understatement: An understatement is a figure of speech employed by writers or speakers to intentionally make a situation seem less important than it really is.

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