The leader may first find out why the person is not

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The leader may first find out why the person is not motivated and if there are any limitations in ability. These two factors may be linked, for example where a person believes they are less capable than they should be may be in some form of denial or other coping . They follower may also lack self-confidence as a result. If the leader focused more on the relationship, the follower may become confused about what must be done and what is optional. The leader thus maintains a clear 'do this' position to ensure all required actions are clear. S2: Selling / Coaching When the follower can do the job, at least to some extent, and perhaps is over-confident about their ability in this, then 'telling' them what to do may demotivate them or lead to resistance. The leader thus needs to 'sell' another way of working, explaining and clarifying decisions. The leader thus spends time listening and advising and, where appropriate, helping the follower to gain necessary skills through coaching methods. Note: S1 and S2 are leader-driven. S3: Participating / Supporting When the follower can do the job, but is refusing to do it or otherwise showing insufficient commitment, the leader need not worry about showing them what to do, and instead is concerned with finding out why the person is refusing and thence persuading them to cooperate. There is less excuse here for followers to be reticent about their ability, and the key is very much around motivation. If the causes are found then they can be addressed by the leader. The leader thus spends time listening , praising and otherwise making the follower feel good when they show the necessary commitment. S4: Delegating / Observing When the follower can do the job and is motivated to do it, then the leader can basically leave them to it, largely trusting them to get on with the job although they also may need to keep a relatively distant eye on things to ensure everything is going to plan. Followers at this level have less need for support or frequent praise, although as with anyone, occasional recognition is always welcome. Note: S3 and S4 are follower-led. The Path-Goal Theory of Leadership explains that organizational goal is set by the leader who also makes the path to be taken by the followers clear and easy. The important role of the leader is to encourage and support the followers in achieving that goal. In particular, leaders clarify the path so subordinates know which way to go, remove roadblocks that are stopping them going there, and increase the rewards along the route.
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Variations in approach depends on the situation, the follower's capability and motivation, as well as the difficulty of the job and other contextual factors. Consider these Leadership styles according to the Path-goal theory
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The leader may first find out why the person is not...

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