Eccentric Reclusive Astute Passive Major Works Data Sheet Page 4 Setting

Eccentric reclusive astute passive major works data

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Eccentric, Reclusive, Astute, Passive
Major Works Data Sheet Page 4 Setting: example and significance (Consider year, historical period and geography) 1) New Orleans represents the traditional Creole lifestyle. Edna uses New Orleans to realize she no longer fits into the setting of the life she used to live before she was awakened at The Grand Isle. 2)Grand Isle represents a setting of freedom to the protagonist, Edna. She uses her time at the Isle to grow and become a more independent woman from her stereotypical Creole life. This is where her awakening process beings and ends. Although the Isle has an influence of Creole lifestyle, Edna doesn’t seem to be influenced by it, and instead she does what she wishes. Significance of the opening scene/chapter Symbols & Their Meaning 1. The parrot in the opening scene is a symbol for Edna's life. Just like the parrot, Edna felt that she was trapped in a cage, squawking without any release, only people leaving in annoyance. Even the words the parrot says “That’s all right!” are symbolic of the front that Edna puts on that she is fine, when really she feels trapped. 2. Water: Initially, Edna does not know how swim. However the moment when she does learn to swim at midnight can be seen as a sort of baptism into this new free lifestyle. Her submergence in the water is symbolic of her submergence into freedom, a freedom that eventually floats her away. 3. Night/Day: The glaring and revealing nature of day, and the secrets that take place by night are in contrast throughout the novel. When Edna first questions her way of life (the midnight swim) occurs at night. All her somewhat questionable and scandalous encounters with Arobin also occur under the shade of night. Finally, the glaring light of day reveals everything in the final scene when Edna commits suicide. 4. Clothing: seen the very first time we meet Edna as she is coming up from the beach. Though she has spent the day on the beach she is curiously not in swimming clothes revealing her reserved nature. This motif is seen Significance of the ending/closing scene/chapter The end of the Awakening can be seen as both a success for Edna or a failure. Towards the end of the tale, Edna realizes that she can’t escape the bonds of the society she lives in through ordinary means. Her husband owns her and her children depend on her, and as Edna says, “I would give any for my children except myself.” This comes true when Edna strips naked and swims out into the sea to drown. This can be seen as a success because Edna finally escapes society and the hold of her children and husband on her free will, the strong outwardly expression being her breaking societal rules and stripping naked to enter the water. You can see the for thought she had in her suicide, because she talks to Victor saying that she would like fish for dinner, showing that she would like to make her death seem to have been an accident, and even more so, she asks for fish which back in those times would have been hard to have on hand and may have to go and fish for themselves leading the family to find her dead body out in the water. But what may have been her success was

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