Families with household incomes within intervals

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families with household incomes within intervals $20,000 - $40,000 and $40,000 - $60,000 averaged a rank of 4, which means they often do eat dinner together. Household incomes within interval $60,000 - $80,000 averaged a rank of 3, which means the families sometimes eat dinner together. Incomes within intervals $80,000 - $100,000 and $100,000 - $120,000 both averaged a rank of 2, which means they rarely eat dinner as a family. Lastly, incomes within the intervals $120,000 - $140,000 and $140,000+ both averaged a rank of 1, which means the families never eat dinner together. Also the line of best fit shows a strong negative correlation since the value of r is 0.9767 which is extremely close to 1. This helps us conclude that families with higher incomes spend less time eating dinner together. - Socio-Economic Status vs. Parents’ Marital Status
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A couple’s marital status based on income could be very important in determining the level of closeness in a family. If a couple is divorced/separated it may be harder for their children to spend equal amount of time with one another. We asked our surveyors about their parent’s marital status, and created a graph based on how many surveyors out of the total in every income interval have divorced / separated parents. 40% (3 out of 7) of surveyed students with household incomes within the interval $20,000 - $40,000 have divorced parents. While 30% (5 out of 16) of surveyed students with household incomes within the interval $40,000 - $60,000 have divorced parents. This was also the lowest divorce percentage within our data. Around 35% (5 out of 13) of students with household incomes within $60,000 - $80,000 have divorced parents. The divorce percentage increased to 45% (4 out of 9) for families with household incomes between $80,000 - $100,000. The percentage started increasing from incomes $80,000 and up. For couples with incomes within the range $100,000 - $120,000, 60% (3 out of 5) are divorced. A lot more than half of our surveyed students with household incomes of $120,000 - $140,000 have divorced parents, to be more precise their divorce percentage is around 65% (4 out of 6). Lastly, families with household incomes of $140,000 and up have a divorce percentage of a high 75% (3 out of 4). This shows that only one surveyor with a household income of $140,000 or more do not have divorced / separated parents. Our results showed that there is a strong, positive correlation between income and marital status. Although we did find a relationship between salary and marital status, since we did not consider other marital status options such as common- law, our data may be somewhat inaccurate. Instead of using a line of best fit, we figured a curve of best fit (exponential trend line) would fit the data better. Our r value ended up being 0.8987
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which is close to 1, meaning that there is a high correlation between income and marital status; higher the income of a family, the higher the divorce percentage. - Socio-Economic Status vs. Students’ Priorities By asking surveyors how important family is to them, considers whether they have a strong relationship with their family. In order to make this variable measurable, we chose a number to correspond with level of importance (1 = Not Important, 2 = Somewhat Important, etc.).
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  • Fall '18
  • Household income in the United States, FAMILY RELATIONS

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