We see a closeup of the mans body as he passes the silent jukebox As if by

We see a closeup of the mans body as he passes the

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closeup of the blonde waitress looking up to see the man. We see a closeup of the man's body as he passes the silent jukebox. As if by magic, the jukebox begins to play a Rhythm and Blues number "I put a spell on you." We see the couple that was holding hands turn in surprise. The man in the booth's face is unlit and we can see no features, but the woman is young with long blonde hair. She looks surprised and pulls her hand away from the man's. We cut to an extreme closeup of the waitresses's face. It is covered with sweat. As she watches the man pass, a smile appears on her face. She comes over to take the man's order. The camera takes the man's point of view. MAN: "Miller Genuine Draft." WAITRESS: "I was hopin' you'd say that." We see a shot of a refrigerator door opening. The refrigerator is filled with sweating, backlit bottles of Miller beer. We then see a closeup of the man holding a bottle and opening it magically with a flick of his thumb (no opener). A montage of shots of the product
Men’s Men and Women’s Women, page 8 amid blowing snow follows this. The sounds of a blizzard are heard. ANNCR: “Cold filtered. Never heat pasteurized. Miller Genuine Draft. For those who discover this real draft taste. . . the world is a very cool place.” On this last line we see close-ups of the woman in the booth and the waitress. Wind is blowing snow in their faces and they are luxuriating in the coolness. The waitress suddenly looks at the camera with shocked disappointment. We cut to an empty seat with the man's empty beer bottle rocking on the table. The music, snow, and wind end abruptly. We see the man's back as he exits the cafe. The final shot is the waitress, elbow propped on the counter, looking after the man. The words "Tap Into The Cold" are supered. When women do appear in men's commercials, they seldom challenge the primary masculine fantasy. Men's women are portrayed as physically attractive, slim, and usually young and white, frequently blonde, and almost always dressed in revealing clothing. Since most men's commercials are set in locations away from home, most men's women appear outside the home, and only infrequently are they portrayed as wives. There are almost always hints of sexual availability in men's women, but this is seldom played out explicitly. Although the sexual objectification of women characters in these ads is often quite subtle, my previous content analysis suggests that it is far more common in weekend than in daytime ads (Craig, 1990, December, p. 34). Men's women are also frequently portrayed as admirers (and at times, almost voyeurs), generally approving of some aspect of product use (the car he drives, the beer he drinks, the credit card he uses). In these respects, the Miller ad is quite typical. What might have been a simple commercial about a man ordering and drinking a beer becomes an elaborate sexual fantasy, in many respects constructed like a porn film. The attractive, eager waitress is mystically drawn to the man who relieves her bored frustrations with an orgasmic chug-a-lug. She is "hot" while he (and the beer) is " very cool." But once he's satisfied, he's gone.

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