Substitute resources o when faced with a resource

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Substitute Resources o When faced with a resource constraint, sometimes using a different type of resource than the one originally planned will help.
Best Used When The resource to be substituted will work with little to no set up or modification required. How Before substituting, evaluate the impact of not using the originally planned resource. If the benefits outweigh the risks, it is likely safe to proceed. Reduce Scope o Other times, simply reducing the scope of the program will help tremendously in offsetting resource constraints. Best Used When The resource shortage is reduced or eliminated as a result of reducing the scope. How Similar to remedying time constraints, you must consider the impact of the reduced scope on the overall project and its deliverables. If the benefits outweigh the risks, it is likely safe to proceed. Adjust Schedule o Recall that some tasks will have slack time associated with them; further, tasks on the critical path will not have any slack. o As such, adjusting the schedule may be the best route for handling a resource-constrained schedule. Best Used When Resource shortages exist because there are concurrent tasks which require the same kind of resources. Some of the aforementioned tasks have slack or float. How If the conditions above are met, it may be possible to move some of the tasks so as to eliminate the conflict entirely. Lesson 4.7 – Schedule Analysis o Schedule Risks and Delays Schedule Risk Schedule risk involves the uncertainty associated with the schedule.
Often, that uncertainty equates to potential schedule delays. Schedule Delay A schedule delay is a type of schedule risk. Potential Causes There are a number of potential causes for schedule delays, some of the more common being: o Uncertainty in task duration estimates o Incorrect schedule relationships or logic o Unrealistic or overly optimistic milestones or deadlines o Cause 1: Uncertainty in Task Duration Estimates Schedules are often built on uncertain estimates. In many cases, they’re built on the assumption that some of the tasks will be completed sooner than estimates, some about the same time as estimated, and some later than estimated. In reality, not many tasks finish sooner than estimated, while quite a few finish later than estimated. There are several reasons for this, including: Parkinson’s Law – Work expands to fit the time allotted. For example, if workers have 20 days to complete a task, they are likely to use all the time allotted. “Student Syndrome” – Basically, procrastination. This is a phenomenon where workers wait to fully apply themselves to a task as they get closer to the end date, which is sometimes compounded by demanded from other tasks they may be involved with.

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