This is done by random terrorism bombings arson

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and by focusing attention on it, to attract latent supporters. This is done by random terrorism, bombings, arson, assassinations, conducted in spectacular a fashion as possible, by concentrated coordinated, and synchronized waves. Examples: the Munich Olympic Massacre in 1972 whereby the PLO guerrillas killed the Israeli Olympic athletics in return for their comrades being detained by the Israel Defend Forces.
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The Second Step: Selective Terrorism This quickly follows the first. The aims are to isolate the counterinsurgent from the masses, to involve the population in the struggle, and to obtain minimum its passive complicity. Among the popular tactics that utilized by the insurgent are killing. This is the popular and common method in various parts of the country, involving some of the low ranking government officials such as policeman, mayors, councilman, and teachers. Their death was an “example” to show to the citizen on their act of violence.
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Selective terrorism were also associated with collecting money. The early supporters are set to work collecting money from the population. This activities has an important side effects as, the amount of money collected provides a simple benchmarking of the loyalty of the supporters of the subversive organization. Examples: the CPM guerrillas imposed a “tax” on their local supporters and in Malaysia and Southern Thailand as a picture of their loyalty to the armed struggle that raised up by the party in the 1970’s. In the selective Terrorism stages, the insurgent will destroy all bridges (associated) linking to the population to the counterinsurgents and his potential allies.
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VULNERABILITY OF THE INSURGENT IN THE ORTHODOX PATTERN
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The insurgent operates necessarily in a country where political opposition is tolerated. During the first two steps (STEP 1 & STEP 2), the creation of a party and organization of a united front: his vulnerability depends directly on the tolerance of the counterinsurgent (government forces) and can be correspondingly low or high. Sooner or later, the counterinsurgent realizes the danger and starts reacting. The insurgent’s vulnerability rises because he has not yet acquired military power, and is in no position to resist by force. If the counterinsurgent’s reaction is feeble enough, the insurgent has survived his first test, has learned how far he can go, and his vulnerability decreases. If all proceeded well, the insurgent has created his party and organized a popular front. They will decides now to initiate a guerrilla warfare (STEP 3).
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Their military power is still nil (none) or feeble, whereas the full weight of his opponent’s may be brought to bear against him. Consequently, the insurgents vulnerability rises sharply to its highest level, and he may well be destroyed. If he survives, his vulnerability goes down again until he starts organizing a regular army (STEP 4). The units was no longer small, however it was an elusive guerrilla troops.
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