So everything i write about in the book and we can

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So everything I write about in the book —and we can talk about what Japan is actually doing and what capabilities it’s investing in and things like tha t— everything I write about has been done without revising Article 9 . The Japan that you see today with the military capability that it has, with the international engagement that it has—in U.N. peacekeeping, in coalition activities led by the United States, now increasingly in military networking with other partners in the Asia-Pacifi c—that Japan managed to do that under the existing Article 9.
AT Japan lacks capacity to prolif Japan is developing its own military industrial complex now Carpenter, 19 [Matthew, writer for Stratfor, “Japan's High-Tech Militarization: Asserting Independence in an Uncertain World,” - asserting-independence-uncertain-world , 6/3/19, acc. 7/5/19, GDI-LBP] Additionally, Japan is committed to developing an independent military-industrial complex . As the country develops its defense capabilities and command structures, it is fostering the ability to research, design and manufacture defense-related items on its own. While maintaining ties with its traditional suppliers in the United States, Tokyo is also investing in small to midsize companies at home to cultivate its own military-industrial supply chain. One area in which this trend is manifesting itself is Japan's commitment to developing its own weaponry, such as Mitsubishi's F-3 stealth fighter, which is slated to become operational by 2035. Moreover, the country is working to produce its own laser weaponry to deploy against enemy drones and other airborne weaponry by 2023.
ROC Answer to Answer Blocks
AT US abandoning ROC now Key members of the Trump administration express commitment to Taiwan security Cronin et.al, Senior Advisor and Senior Director of the Asia-Pacific Security Program at the Center for a New American Security, 2018 (Patrick, Jonathan Greenert, John M. Shalikashvili Chair in National Security Studies at the National Bureau of Asian Research, Shirley Kan, specialist in Asian security affairs, Peter Mattis, Research Fellow for China Studies at the Victims of Communism Memorial Foundation, Michael Mazza, Research Fellow in the Foreign and Defense Policy Studies Program at the American Enterprise Institute, “STRENGTHENING U.S.-TAIWAN DEFENSE RELATIONS,” National Bureau of Asian Research, May 2018, accessed 7/7/19, GDI – JBII) As 2017 changed to 2018, however, there were signs of a new approach to China. The National Security Strategy and the National Defense Strategy both described U.S.-China relations in competitive terms. The former , moreover, was the first National Security Strategy to mention Taiwan: “We will maintain our strong ties with Taiwan in accordance with our ‘One China’ policy, including our commitments under the Taiwan Relations Act to provide for Taiwan’s legitimate defense needs and deter coercion.” 3

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