sit Like course sit is a very simple word with an unexpected meaning When the

Sit like course sit is a very simple word with an

  • Assessment
  • 31
  • 100% (2) 2 out of 2 people found this document helpful

This preview shows page 7 - 9 out of 31 pages.

• sit Like “course,” sit is a very simple word with an unexpected meaning. When the  IELTS talks about university learning, to sit is to complete a course or exam. If someone fails a course or exam, the IELTS might say that they need to “resit” the course or  exam. IELTS Reading The IELTS Reading section features the most advanced vocabulary on the test. You’ll  see a lot of unfamiliar, highly specialized vocabulary for different academic subjects.  You may wonder, “How can I know all of these words?” The good news is that you don’t have to know all of the advanced academic vocabulary you see on IELTS Reading.  Allow me to explain. Vocabulary-in-Context Strategies for IELTS Reading Knowing high-level vocabulary certainly helps you in IELTS Reading. But IELTS  Reading isn’t just a test of your English vocabulary. It also tests your ability to read  passages strategically. To successfully navigate IELTS Reading vocabulary, you need  to make educated guesses at the meanings of new, unfamiliar words. You also need to  be able to guess that the meaning of challenging sentences, paragraphs, and  passages, even when you don’t understand all the words. No matter how many IELTS vocabulary words you study, you will come across words  you don’t know on the IELTS, especially in the IELTS Reading section. Below are some  strategies you can use when that happens. Looking at the word form Prefixes appear at the beginning of words and can help you guess a word’s meaning. Take for  example, the IELTS Reading vocabulary word “understory.” The prefix “under” can be used on  its own as a preposition, so this word may describe the position of something. Suffixes hint at both the meaning of a word and its part of speech. Take the IELTS  Reading word “geology.” The suffix “-ology” appears at the end of nouns, describing an  academic study or discipline. This word is probably the name of a science.
Image of page 7
Looking at context Prefixes and suffixes are useful, but sometimes misleading. Look at “understory” again. “Under” does look like a preposition. However, this prefix can also mean “hidden” (as in “underworld”)  or “insufficiently” (as in “underfunded”). Which meaning does “under” have? Suppose that the  IELTS Reading paragraph with the word “understory” deals 11 about things found on the ground. In that case, you can know that the meaning probably is prepositional. Similarly, the suffix “-ate” in the word “tolerate” can be used at the end  of nouns, verbs, or adjectives. Again, context is key. In the IELTS Reading phrase 
Image of page 8
Image of page 9

You've reached the end of your free preview.

Want to read all 31 pages?

  • One '18
  • Booksknot
  • IELTS, IELTS Speaking, IELTS SPEAKING 2018, IELTS EXAM 2018, IELTS TEST 2018, IELTS ACADEMIC 2018, IELTS GENERAL 2018, IELTS EXAM ANSWERS

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

Stuck? We have tutors online 24/7 who can help you get unstuck.
A+ icon
Ask Expert Tutors You can ask You can ask You can ask (will expire )
Answers in as fast as 15 minutes