Gideon v Wainwright 1963 Helps lead the way to Miranda v Arizona in 1966 Gideon

Gideon v wainwright 1963 helps lead the way to

This preview shows page 4 - 6 out of 8 pages.

much as another's.” Gideon v. Wainwright 1963 Helps lead the way to Miranda v. Arizona in 1966. Gideon was denied a court appointed attorney in a non-capital case. He defended himself. Eventually he was granted an appeal to the Supreme Court. The Court held that the due process clause of the 5th and 14th amendments meant that a court appointed attorney was constitutionally guaranteed. Escobedo v. Illinois 1964 Also helps lead the way to Miranda v. Arizona in 1966. Escobedo was given an attorney, but that attorney was not allowed to be present during questioning. The Court held that the due process clause of the 5th and 14th amendments meant that the defendan t’s attorney was to be present during questioning. New York Times v. Sullivan 1964 William Brennan wrote this decision that shielded the press from vindictive libel suits. As part of a fund raising effort for the Civil Rights struggle against lunch counter segregation a group, including Jackie Robinson, took out an ad in the New York Times on March 29, 1960. There were minor errors in the ad. The police commissioner of Montgomery, Alabama brought a suit against the Times claiming that readers would connect him to the police activities that were overstated in the ad. In his opinion Justice Brennan wrote that officials, like Sullivan, had the “high burden” of proving that statements about them were not sim ply overstated, but were published with “reckless disregard” for the truth. Griswold v. Connecticut 1965 There is no mention of the right of privacy in the Constitution, in Griswold the Court pulled together elements of the 1st, 3rd, 4th, 5th, 9th, and 14th Amendments to recognize that personal privacy is one of the rights protected by the Constitution. Connecticut maintained a law, passed in 1879, that made it illegal to use anything to “prevent conception.” The state had never prosecuted any doctors under the law, but in 1961, acting on a complaint filed against Planned Parenthood, the state arrested Estelle Griswold, the director of its New Haven clinic. She admitted guilt and was fined $100 for giving contraceptives to married couples. She appealed to the Supreme Court. The opinion was written by Wil liam O. Douglas. In it Douglas suggested that “specific guarantees in the Bill of Rights have penumbras, formed by emanations from those guarantees that help give them life and substance.” In his opinion Douglas pointed to the amendments above (except the 14th) and suggested that they had “penumbras” that created “zones of privacy.” In other words, no state could make laws that violated this “zone of privacy” by making it illegal to sell or use contraceptives . Miranda v. Arizona 1966 Required that arre sting officers notify a suspect that “you have the right to remain silent...” (if you watch Law and Order , you know the rest…) and that the suspect has the right to the presence of an attorney during questioning. Despite recent challen ges (by Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals) , in 2000 the Court reaffirmed Miranda in Dickerson v. United States .
Image of page 4
Case Year Page 5 of 8 Loving v. Virginia
Image of page 5
Image of page 6

You've reached the end of your free preview.

Want to read all 8 pages?

  • Fall '
  • Misc
  • Supreme Court of the United States, First Amendment to the United States Constitution, Fourteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture