Crc cards with the crc technique crc stands for class

This preview shows page 49 - 53 out of 182 pages.

CRC cards With the CRC technique (CRC stands for Class Responsibility Collabo- ration ), context aspects and their respective attributes and properties are denoted on index cards. Requirements are then formulated using these cards. Audio and video recordings Audio and video recordings are very well suited to elicit requirements when stakeholders are not always available, when budget is tight, or when the system is highly critical. Especially during field observations, audio and video recordings can help capture fast-paced processes. The disadvantage of this technique is that stakeholders often feel supervised when they are being recorded and as a result might deliver biased state- ments or, in extreme cases, might even refuse to cooperate. Modeling action sequences Use case modeling: Use cases document the external view of the system to be developed. A use case has a trigger event, which triggers the use case and an expected result, or outcome of the use case. Every use case is a functionality that must be supported by the system to be developed (see section 6.3 ). Prototypes for illustration Prototypes are well suited to question established requirements and to elicit requirements in situations where stakeholders have only a vague
Image of page 49

Subscribe to view the full document.

3.4 Summary 31 understanding of what is to be developed. Potential consequences of new or changed requirements can be identified easier. For example, user interface prototypes are frequently used in practice to find addi- tional functional requirements. 3.4 Summary Requirements elicitation is a core activity in requirements engineering. Aside from documents and legacy systems, stakeholders are the main sources for requirements. It is important to initially agree upon mutual rights and responsibilities of the stakeholders and the requirements engi- neer in order to facilitate communication and cooperation and to success- fully integrate the stakeholders into the elicitation process. The choice of the right elicitation technique for the respective project is made by the requirements engineer based on the given cultural, organizational, and domain-specific constraints.
Image of page 50
Image of page 51

Subscribe to view the full document.

33 4 Documenting Requirements In requirements engineering, information that has been established or worked out during different activities must be documented. Among this information are, for example, protocols of interviews and reports of vali- dation or agreement activities, but also change requests. The main and most important documentation task in requirements engineering, though, is to document the requirements for the system in a suitable manner. 4.1 Document Design A documentation technique is any kind of more or less formal depiction that eases communication between stakeholders and increases the quality of the documented requirements. In principle, any kind of documentation technique can be used to document the requirements, let it be natural lan- guage-based documentation by means of prose, more structured natural language-based text, or more formal techniques such as state diagrams.
Image of page 52
Image of page 53

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern

Ask Expert Tutors You can ask 0 bonus questions You can ask 0 questions (0 expire soon) You can ask 0 questions (will expire )
Answers in as fast as 15 minutes