on each job dimension of one employee with that of others to establish a rank

On each job dimension of one employee with that of

This preview shows page 2 - 5 out of 11 pages.

on each job dimension) of one employee with that of others to establish a rank order of  performance Problems: - Provide no information on how the employee performs on different job  dimensions - Cannot be used for developmental or training purposes Four relative rating systems:
Image of page 2
1. Rank order 2. Paired comparisons 3. Forced distribution 4. Relative percentile method Rank order:  rank employees in order of their perceived overall performance Problems: - May have idea of who the best and worst performers are but often have difficulty  assigning ranks to the remaining employees - System is relative so does not tell whether any or all of the workers are  performing above or below acceptable levels Paired comparisons:  compare overall performance of each worker with that of every  other worker who must be evaluated then rank on the basis of the number of times they  were selected as the top-rated performer over all the comparisons Problem: - Large number of comparisons that have to be made (tedious, rush the procedure) - Does not provide information on absolute performance levels - Best for small samples Forced distribution:  sets up a limited number of categories that are tied to performance  standards and the rater is forced to place a predetermined number percentage of workers  into each of the rating categories Problems: - Having a set percentage to place into extreme categories distorts the true state of  affairs - Useful with large samples - Assumes employee performance is normally distributed - Negative reactions Relative Percentile Method (RPM):  compare individuals on job performance  dimensions that have been derived through job analytic procedures - Requires rater to use a 101-point scale (0 to 100) - Score of 50 represents average performance - For each performance dimension, or for the global comparison, a rater uses the  scale to assess each ratee relative to one another - Anchors each rater’s comparison to an absolute standard, and thus allows  meaningful comparisons among ratings obtained from different raters - Produces validity estimates and levels of accuracy that surpass those obtained  with some absolute rating scales - Best relative rating method
Image of page 3
Absolute rating systems:  compare the performance of one worker with an absolute  standard of performance Developed to provide either an overall assessment of performance or assessments on  specific job dimensions Four methods: 1. Graphic rating scales 2. Critical incidents 3. Behaviorally anchored rating scale 4. Behavior observation scales Graphic rating scales:  usually consist of the name of the job component or dimension, a brief definition of the dimension, a scale with equal intervals between the numbers placed on the scale, verbal labels or anchors attached to the numerical scale, and instructions for  making a response Judgment of “how much” of a trait or factor an employee has Critical incidents:  behaviors that result in good or poor job performance Behaviorally Anchored Rating Scales (BARS):  uses job behaviors derived through a 
Image of page 4
Image of page 5

You've reached the end of your free preview.

Want to read all 11 pages?

  • Fall '14
  • SarahJaneRoss
  • Psychology, supervisor, Introduction 2003

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture