They decide how why where and even when that argument based on specific

They decide how why where and even when that argument

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They decide how, why, where, and even when that argument based on specific readings will be experienced by its recipient(s). Following these decisions, they begin generating the complex ac- tion sequences leading to the realization of their final product(s). For Prakas, a desire to underscore the point that the OED database provided "poor connection[s] between the word and the actual meaning" served as the cata- lyst for the steps leading to the creation of the piece's on-screen component. More specifically, Prakas's inclusion of the tales and his appropriation of the MC program was his attempt to "rewrite" the database, providing those who experienced the onscreen version with what he believed was a truer sense of the word. At the end of his piece, Prakas explicitly states that his reenvisioning of OED data was crafted, in part, as a teaching tool and, in part, as a prototype for a "truer," or more interactive,version of the OED: 286 This content downloaded from 129.210.6.137 on Tue, 1 Apr 2014 21:53:11 PM All use subject to JSTOR Terms and Conditions
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SHIPKA / A MULTIMODAL TASK-BASED FRAMEWORK Hopefully if you followed the direction [sic] exactly as I told you, by now you should know the true meaning of the word "scare." For the benefit of those people who are starting to learn English (I used to be one myself), it will be very interesting to see a dictionary in the future that usesa similar method as I did above to describe definitions of words. Instructors working within this framework are still responsible for de- signing tasks in accordance with course goals and objectives. Yet, again, rather than predetermining the specific materials and methodologies that students employ in service of those goals, tasks are structured in ways that ask students to assume responsibility for attending to the following: * the product(s)they will formulate in response to a given task-this might take the form of a printed text, a performance, a handmade or repurposed object, or, should students choose to engineer a multipart rhetorical event, any combination thereof * the operations, processes, or methodologies that will be (or could be) employed in generating that product--depending on what students aim to achieve, this might involve collecting data from texts, conduct- ing surveys, interviews or experiments, sewing, searching online, woodworking, filming, recording,shopping, staging rehearsals, etc. * the resources, materials, and technologies that will be (or could be) employed in the generation of that product-again, depending on what they aim to achieve this could involve, paper, wood, libraries, comput- ers, needle and thread, stores, food, music, glue, tape, etc. 0 the specific conditions in, under,or with which the final product will be experienced--this involves determining or otherwise structuring the delivery, reception, and/or circulation of their final product. (Adapted from Doyle 161) Importantly, upon completing each task provided to them overthe course of a semester, students are required to compose a highly detailed written ac- count of theirwork, something that my
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