Table 4 The average mean grip strength force N for each specific height

Table 4 the average mean grip strength force n for

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that as the height increased, the average mean grip strength also increased as well. Table 4: The average mean grip strength force (N) for each specific height category Class Grip Strength Height (rounded to nearest inch) Average mean grip strength of dominant hand (N) 1.52 m (5’) or below N/A 1.55-1.63 m (5’1”- 5’4”) 175.68 1.65-1.73 m (5’5”- 5’8”) 172.89 1.75-1.83 m (5’9”- 6’) 239.45 1.85 m (6’1”) and above 287 Average mean grip strength force ( N ) of dominant hand for height : 1.55 1.63 m ( 5 1 5 4 ) ¿ 157.8 + 221.1 + 178.6 + 145.2 4 = 175.68
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In addition to Table 4, the average mean grip strength of the dominant hand was graphed in comparison to height. As the height increased, so did the average grip strength. 1.55-1.63 m (5'1 ; ; ; 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 350 Average mean grip strength of dominant hand in comparison to height Height Average nea grip strength of dominant hand (N) Figure 3: The height of the class set data in measured in average grip strength of the dominant hand The table shows of the individual pinch strength of the fingers by measuring from each successive finger starting from the index finger ending at the little finger. The general trend shows that the force (N) decreases as the individual progresses down from the index to the little finger. Table 5: The individual pinch strength data (N) for the fingers Individual Pinch Strength Data Mean force (N) Dominant hand index finger 59.6 N Dominant hand middle finger 30.1 N Dominant hand ring finger 28.7 N Dominant hand little finger 31.0 N The table presents the mean grip strength (N) in terms of interval in seconds and the EMG data measured in mV. The general trend showed that the mean grip strength is associated with the amount of output that is consistent with the time intervals as the test proceeds without any sort of visual feedback. The difference of the mV is also shown. Table 6: Grip Strength with EMG sensor measuring mean grip strength (N) and mV (no Visual) Continuous Grip Strength without Visual Feedback
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Time Interval Mean grip strength (N) EMG Data Max (mV) Min (mV) ΔmV 0- 20 s 169.9 2.35 -1.23 3.58 60 - 80 s 79.2 3.33 -1.23 4.56 80 - 100 s 106.0 2.98 -1.23 4.21 The mean grip strength (N) is also concurrently measured with a EMG sensor that shows the mV. The general trend shows that with the visual feedback, the strength is increasing as the interval increases. Table 7: Grip Strength with EMG sensor measuring mean grip strength (N) and mV (Visual) Continuous Grip Strength with Visual Feedback Time Interval Mean grip strength (N) EMG Data Max (mV) Min (mV) ΔmV 0- 20 s 136.9 2.88 -1.18 4.06 60 - 80 s 71.4 2.55 -1.18 3.73 80 - 100 s 116.1 3.88 -1.18 4.56 In the experiment in which the grip strength is tested by rapidly gripped vs. relaxation, the general trend shows an increase towards the beginning, but an increase in mV despite the fact that the N is decreasing. Table 8: Rapid and relax grip strength (N) with EMG sensor measuring mV in an interval Repetitive Grip Strength Time Interval Mean grip strength (N) EMG Data Max (mV) Min (mV) ΔmV 0- 20 s 85.0 3.71 0.005 3.71 60 - 80 s 40.1 4.40 0.005 4.39 80 - 100 s 57.0 4.47 0.005 4.47 The individual grip strength that tested grip strength in newtons with the left and right hand in terms of maximum and mean force.
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Figure 4: Screenshot displaying the mean and maximum force exerted measured in newtons.
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