b Ethical Theories that would be in favor with big agriculture are a

B ethical theories that would be in favor with big

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b) Ethical Theories that would be in favor with big agriculture are: a. Instrumental good: those things whose value is the fact that they help to bring about other good things. Like pesticides being instrumentally good in making more food for people. b. Categorical reason: reason to do something that applies regardless of their desires. For example, the farmer needs to use the GMO to get a better crop even if they don’t want to. c. Act Utilitarianism: acts are considered morally right because they bring the greatest good to the most people. Production farming allows food prices to be lower, allowing more people the ability to get food at a lower price. d. Argument from Expected Benefit: the claim that people always expect their actions to leave them a bit better off, with their actions to have consistent gain. Farmers can expect a better crop, people will have food, we are all better off.
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Cristine Rojas Article 7: “Agri-Intellectual Reason” Christopher Bedford April 23, 2017 Authors Note: Christopher Bedford was a filmmaker, writer, speaker, and organic farmer. Active in working against pollution form chemical companies. Long-term partner Diana Jancek and Bedford owned and operated Sweetwater Local Foods Market in Montague, Michigan. 2 He was passionate in brining local organic foods to his market. He also advocated for healthier food for school children’s meals. Reading # 7 “Agri-Intellectual Reason” Notes: 2 Source:
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Blake Hurst is criticizing the local food movement as an “effete endeavor” by uninformed people. (fruitless, lacking effort) Blake conflates and confuses the personal with systemic misidentifying his family’s hard work and integrity with an industrial food system that is blatantly unsustainable, exploitative, unfair, and without integrity Corporate “disinformation” has used this marketing tactic since the late 1960’s anti- smoking campaign had push back from big tobacco They create straw men that are knocked out by corporate messages. Disinformation efforts deflect farmer attention away from global corporate monopoly control of the food system that dictates prices and production standards/procedures towards agri-intellectuals and “wacko” consumers “Whenever we get too close to the truth, a good scandal can distract our attention.” Farmers are trapped in a Stockholm Syndrome relationship with the industrial food system. They bet “the farm” on oil intensive, water intensive mono-crop production techniques dictated to them by global monopoly food corporations Consumers more and more want food raised in ways that echo and respect their values: local food production, humane treatment of animals, no antibiotics or hormones, and based on building healthy living soil Not a scheme, are not wacko acts, but a simple expression of the free market system “the customer is always right”
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