Options for a community cat management program with

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options for a community cat management program with the requirements of the Cat Management Act 2009 in mind. King Island Council also conducts sporadic trapping in rural areas. Wildlife management and monitoring The Tasmanian PWS has been responsible for a number of projects on the Island including: recording sightings of vagrant birds, waterfowl, threatened species and marine mammals; King Island Biodiversity Management Plan 76
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habitat management including the construction of walking tracks, stock exclusion fences, viewing platforms, breeding boxes and weed control; management of feral goats and cats within Reserves; and fire management and rehabilitation within Reserves. Threatened birds In 2004 KINRMG secured funding from the Threatened Species Network to carry out a Threatened Bird Recovery project. The aim of the project was to: determine the extent of six forest birds of King Island and to address their habitat needs; raise awareness in the community about the Island’s threatened bird species; collate data on bird sightings; and encourage Green Rosellas ( Platycercus caledonicus brownii ) to breed through volunteers setting up and regularly checking nest boxes. In 2007/08 KINRMG conducted a project aimed at the management and restoration of Orange-bellied parrot habitat across the Island. Project objectives are consistent with the national Orange-bellied parrot recovery plan and actions are included in the KIBMP. Waterwatch From 2001–2009 KINRMG has been running a Waterwatch program, which aims to assess the quality of the Island's waterways. It included monthly monitoring of nine sites to obtain baseline data of the quality of streams and a community education component. Devolved grant work Devolved grant work, funded through the Natural Heritage Trust was conducted from 2000–2003 aimed at management of vegetation communities across the Island. Works included fencing, re-vegetation and direct seeding projects, the development of several strategies and the publication of a number of books and reports. A community group worked intensely for over a year on the publication of a field guide to King Island's flora (KINRMG 2002). A revolving fund was set up with the assistance of the Tasmanian Land Conservancy to protect valuable ecosystems through buying properties, covenanting and re-selling them. Threatened species education To support the development and adoption of the KIBMP and foster community ownership, a series of threatened species brochures have been completed by KINRMG with support from the Cradle Coast Authority. The aim of the brochures is to introduce the King Island community to the broad range of threatened species found on the Island and to develop a sense of pride and ownership in their management.
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