Types of decision making processes i habitual routine

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Types of decision-making processes: i. Habitual / routine decision making – low involvement and as to do with automatic, frequently purchased, low-cost items needing very little search-and-decision effort. ii. Limited decision making – purchase products occasionally or need info about an unfamiliar brand in a familiar product category. iii. Extended / real decision making – employed when unfamiliar, high-involvement, expensive or infrequently bought products are purchased. A consumer goes through all the stages of the decision making process with extensive info search and complex evaluation of the evoked set. iv. Impulse buying – purchase solely on impulse. No conscious planning, but stems from a powerful urge to buy something immediately. o Evaluation of alternatives: They evaluate or assess the various alternatives, using all the information they have at hand, together with their experience, and come to a decision. 21
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Evaluation criteria are moulded and influenced by individual and environmental variables. Individual influences, such as personality and attitudes, have an impact on expected outcomes. o Buying: They buy the item they have chosen. The most suitable choice is the one that comes closest to the evaluation criteria formulated by the consumer. o Post-buying evaluation: They use the product and evaluate whether they are satisfied with it, i.e. whether it satisfies their need and solves the problem. Post-buying evaluation response: i. Post-buying satisfaction – outcome >= expectation ii. Post-buying dissatisfaction – outcome < expectations iii. Neutral assessment – Inertia (buy the same brand to save time and effort) iv. Post-buying conflict – doubt or anxiety (post buying dissonance) Study unit 12 – Family decision making Functions of the family include the socialisation of family members, contributing to the economic wellbeing of family members, providing emotional support, and shaping the lifestyles of family members. Family Roles in the family: o Influencers – provide info to other members about a product or service o Gatekeepers control flow of info about a product into the family o Deciders decide by themselves or with others whether to shop for, buy, use, consume or dispose of a specific product o Buyers do actual buying o Preparers transform the product into a form suitable for consumption by other family members o Users use or consume a particular product o Maintainers service products so that they will provide continued satisfaction o Disposers decide on or carry out the disposal The traditional family life cycle consists of the following basic stages: o Bachelorhood – young single adult living apart from parents o Honeymooners – young married couple o Parenthood – married couple with at least one child living at home o Post-parenthood – older married couple with no children at home o Dissolution – one surviving spouse The modified family life cycle: o At-home singles o Starting-out singles 22
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o Mature singles o
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  • Winter '08
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  • Marketing, Study Unit, South African

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