Did they assimulate and integrate in the economy for

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Did they assimulate and integrate in the economy? For the Germans, it was much easier. Some groups really wanted to assimulate to American culture, they needed to adjust and learn how to speak English. Needed to adapt their diets. Church leaders encouraged assimulation. Nativism – Native born whites resented immigrants. Out of fear, and out of prejudice. They did not like their foreigners, and they thought that immigrants were the source of disorder. Disliked Catholics and Jews. Some native born whites believed that eastern and southern Europeans would dilute the American race. People had to pay to come to the US Government is trying to prevent certain groups from coming to America. Congress passes an act that says immigrants should be literate. There were more people in favor of immigration. The main reason is that these immigrants provided cheap labor. These immigrants are going to play a major role in the new economy. Corporations want immigrants to work for them. The Age of the City An urban night life sprung up by 1900 because of electricity. City life began to get fun. Minstrel Shows as Cultural Nostalgia One of the biggest themes in American show business was “the western frontier”, brought on by Buffalo Bill Cody’s Wild West Show. Minstrel Shows
Most significant form of public entertainment for most of the nineteenth century. White performers in blackface played as plantation slaves. During the Civil War and Reconstruction, minstrel shows portrayed blacks with gross racial stereotypes and subjected abolitionists to ridicule. Billy Kersands was the most famous black minstrel of the nineteenth century. The largest and most successful minstrel shows were the ones with a white cast and heavy racism. Vaudeville Inexpensive houses that offered music, singing, sketches, and variety acts. The Vaudeville was originally only a male thing, but in the 1880’s women were enjoying it as well. Theater owners regulated smoking and banned alcohol consumption to promote an image of family entertainment. They also booked opera singers or famous musicians to enhance vaudeville’s reputation for respectability. By the turn of the century, this was one of the most popular forms of public entertainment. Sports Become Professional Baseball and prize fighting became professionalized. Prizefighting Richard Kyle Fox used his magazine and wealth to transform boxing. Fox made the sport more profitable and more respectable and he introduced standardized rules. Entrepreneurs sponsored matches at indoor rings where they could control unruly audiences with police and security guards. By the 1890s it was one of the most popular spectator sports in America, second only to baseball.

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