The state Peace and Development Council SPDC supreme body of the regime rejects

The state peace and development council spdc supreme

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The state Peace and Development Council (SPDC), supreme body of the regime rejects the existence of a separate ethnic group called “Rohingya”. They are not recognized as
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one of the 135 national races by Myanmar government. As per the rules stated in section 3 of the 1982 citizenship Law, the Rohingyas are not considered to be a National ethnic group and therefore, they are not qualified to obtain full citizenship. However, the family list only indicates names of family members and date of birth. It may not indicate place of birth, which in-effect prevents people from furnishing conclusive evidence of birth in Myanmar as required by the 1982 Law. Thus the theoretical entitlement to citizenship for Rohingyas becomes meaningless in practice. In fact, the 1982 act was specially designed effectively to deny the Rohingyas the right to a nationality because the promulgation of this law took place soon after the Rohingyas who fled to Bangladesh during 1978 had been repatriated. According to a report by Amnesty International this law is certainly discriminatory and is in clear violation of Myanmar’s obligation as a state and a member of the UN to protect and respect human rights without distinction, such as race, color, sex, Language, religion Political or other opinion , national or social origin, property, birth or other status. Restriction on mobility The military regime has prohibited the Rohingyas, their rights to freedom of movement and selection of their place of residence within the state. According to the Law, Rohingyas in northern Arakan state must routinely apply for permission before traveling to other villages or towns. However, this law does not apply to the Rakhine population in the same Rakhine state. Travel restrictions have further increased following the outbreak of communal violence in Sittwe, the capital of Rakhine state in February, 2001. Their inability to travel freely greatly inhibits the Rohingyas ability to earn a living and obtain proper health care. Freedom of movement is a fundamental human right upon which other human rights are contingent. Article 13 of the UDHR (Universal Declaration of Human Rights) state that everyone has the right to freedom of movement and residence within the border of each state. The sweeping restrictions on the movement of Rohingyas are disproportionate and discriminatory; they are imposed on all Rohingyas because they are Rohingya and not on members of other ethnic nationalities in Rakhine state. They are broad and indiscriminate in their application and as such are unlawful.
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Forced Labour Forced labor on infrastructure projects mainly road is one of the most common forms of the practice in Myanmar. But those who can pay a bribe to the authorities can be excused from forced labor. The practice of forced labor prevents the poorer Rohingyas from having sufficient time to earn cash income to sustain them and achieve food security for their families.
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  • Spring '17
  • Shiraz Paracha
  • Burma, Rohingya

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