4 17 Examples of Data Warehouse Architecture In relational databases companies

4 17 examples of data warehouse architecture in

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4-17 Examples of Data Warehouse ArchitectureIn relational databases, companies often use the same relational DBMS for their datawarehouse as they use for their operational database, but loaded onto a separate server and tunedfor fast retrieval and reporting. Furthermore, data cubes create multidimensional cubes thataccommodate complex, grouped data arranged in hierarchies. Retrieval is very fast because dataare already grouped in logical dimensions, such as sales by product, city, region, and country.Next, the virtual federated warehouse relies on a cooperating collection of existing databases;software extracts and transforms the data in real time rather than taking snapshots at periodicintervals. This approach is the most suitable to meet today's growing demand for real-timeinformation. Finally, the data warehouse appliance is a prepackaged data warehouse solutionoffered by vendors that includes the hardware and software, maintenance, and support.4-19 Data MiningData mining is a type of intelligence gathering that uses statistical techniques to explorelarge data sets, hunting for hidden patterns and relationships that are undetectable in routinereports. The difference between data mining and data drudging is that data mining leads toimportant findings, while "data drudging," sniffs out relationships that might just occur byaccident and that have little value. The main goal of data mining is to identify the mostpromising data sources, build data collections, and then make meaningful discoveries.
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DISCUSSION QUESTIONS WEEK 2 64-21 Ownership IssuesAlthough a company may set the policy that all information resources are company-owned, in practice, people often view these resources more protectively, even when complianceand security don’t demand tight access controls. Norms about how records are used emerge overtime, and though many are unwritten, they can certainly affect employees’ behavior. Anotherchallenge is simply how long it can take to make changes to an integrated enterprise databasewhen so many people might be affected and will want input. This process takes time, not just forIT staff to analyze the impact but for all the stakeholders to discuss it as well.5-1 Major Categories of Information SystemsThe four major categories of information systems that support business processescommon to most organizations include finance and asset management, human capitalmanagement, supply chain management, and customer relationship management. Finance andasset management comprises accounts payable, accounts receivable, general ledger, inventory,and procurement. Human capital management includes human resources management, payroll,benefits, time sheets, talent development, and training programs. Supply chain managementcomprises supply chain planning software, warehouse management, and transportationmanagement. Finally, customer relationship management includes contact management,marketing campaign management, email marketing, sales force management, and customerservice.
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  • Spring '19
  • Stefanie Litz
  • Customer relationship management

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